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High Blood Pressure Drugs

If you've been diagnosed with high blood pressure, then it's likely you and your doctor have discussed a plan to lower your blood pressure. For most people, medication is a major part of that plan. High blood pressure drugs are also called "anti-hypertensive" medicine.

Your doctor has many different high blood pressure drugs to choose from. These medications work in a variety of ways to lower blood pressure. Remember, though, that they do not cure high blood pressure. Rather, the goal of high blood pressure medicine is to control your blood pressure, bringing it back down to a normal level.

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Taking High Blood Pressure Drugs Properly

If you're like most people with high blood pressure, drugs are a major part of your plan to lower your blood pressure. Your doctor's goal is to find the right combination of high blood pressure medicines that accomplishes these goals: Lowers your high blood pressure to normal levels Is easy to take Has few or no side effects How can you work with your doctor to make sure your high blood pressure medicine is meeting these goals? Perhaps these 10 tips can help.

Read the Taking High Blood Pressure Drugs Properly article > >

What are the different types of high blood pressure medicines? How do they control high blood pressure? Let's take a closer look at each group.

Diuretics for High Blood Pressure

This type of high blood pressure medicine helps your kidneys remove salt and water from your body. One of the results is that you have less blood volume circulating in your blood vessels. Less volume in the vessels leads to lower blood pressure.

Diuretics are often called "water pills." They are usually the first type of high blood pressure drug that your doctor will try. Here are some examples:

  • Aldactone (spironolactone)
  • Dyrenium (triamterene)
  • Esidrix, Hydrodiuril, and Microzide (hydrochlorothiazide or HCTZ)
  • Hygroton and Thalitone (chlorthalidone)
  • Lasix (furosemide)
  • Lozol (indapamide)
  • Midamor (amiloride hydrochloride)
  • Mykrox and Zaroxolyn (metolazone)

Your doctor may ask you to take one or even two diuretics at once. Here are some examples of combination diuretics:

  • Aldactazide (spironolactone and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Dyazide and Maxzide (hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene)
  • Moduretic (amiloride hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide)

Beta-Blockers and High Blood Pressure

This type of high blood pressure medicine makes the heartbeat slow down. Beta-blockers also keep your heart from pumping so hard. This makes blood go through your vessels with less force. The pressure inside your blood vessels goes down.

Here are some examples of beta-blockers:

  • Blocadren (timolol)
  • Cartrol (carteolol hydrochloride)
  • Coreg (carvedilol)
  • Corgard (nadolol)
  • Inderal (propranolol)
  • Kerlone (betaxolol)
  • Levatol (penbutolol sulfate)
  • Lopressor and Toprol XL (metoprolol)
  • Sectral (acebutolol)
  • Tenormin (atenolol)
  • Visken (pindolol)
  • Zebeta (bisoprolol fumarate)
  • Normodyne and Trandate (labetolol)
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