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Heartburn/GERD Health Center

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Frequently Asked Questions About Heartburn and Reflux

1. When should I take an antacid vs. a Famotidine(Pepcid-AC) or Omeprazole (Prilosec)-like product?

Let's start with the basics. Antacids neutralize excess stomach acid to relieve heartburn, sour stomach, acid indigestion, and stomach upset. They are sometimes prescribed to help relieve the pain of stomach and duodenal ulcers. Some antacids also contain simethicone, an ingredient that helps eliminate excess gas.

You should take antacids exactly as directed by your doctor, or according to the manufacturer's directions. For stomach or duodenal ulcers, take the medicine for as long as your doctor tells you. If you are using the tablets, chew them well before swallowing for faster relief.

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To help prevent symptoms of a hiatal hernia: Wear loose clothing. Anything that presses on the stomach can aggravate hiatal hernia symptoms. When your stomach is full, avoid bending over or lying down. This increases abdominal pressure and makes heartburn more likely. Do not bend over or lie down for two to three hours after eating. Raise the head of the bed six to eight inches by using wooden blocks under the bedposts. To help prevent hiatal hernia: Maintain a healthy...

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Serious side effects can occur with an overdose or overuse of antacids. Side effects include constipation, diarrhea, change in the color of bowel movements, and stomach cramps. Products containing calcium may cause kidney stones and are more likely to cause constipation.

Products like Pepcid-AC are called histamine-2 blockers or H2 blockers. These drugs reduce production of stomach acid. Pepcid AC and other H2 blockers such as Tagamet HB, Zantac 75, and Axid AR are available in prescription-strength or in lower doses in over-the-counter varieties. These products are for relief of heartburn, acid indigestion, sour stomach, and other conditions, such as stomach ulcers.

The newest type of heartburn medication to become available without a prescription is Prilosec. Prilosec belongs to a family of drugs called proton pump inhibitors or PPIs. This type of drug is often used when antacids or H2 blockers fail. PPIs block the secretion of acid from the stomach. Prevacid and Nexium 24HR can be bought over the counter. Protonix, Aciphex, Dexilant, and Nexium are examples of other PPIs that are available only by prescription.

PPIs generally cause few side effects, but they do interact with other common drugs such as warfarin (Coumadin), some heart medications and antibiotics, so it is important to review all medications with your doctor.

Antacids work the quickest to relieve occasional heartburn. For patients who do not respond to antacids, H2 blockers and PPIs are alternatives. Remember, though, that frequent or severe episodes of reflux should always be discussed with your doctor.

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