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Hepatitis Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Hepatitis

  1. Hepatitis B Viral DNA - Topic Overview

    The hepatitis B virus contains DNA. If DNA from the hepatitis B virus is found in your blood sample,then your doctor knows that the virus is multiplying. You are contagious when HBV DNA is present. The higher the level of HBV DNA,the more contagious you are. If you have a long-term (chronic) HBV infection,the presence of high levels of viral DNA means that you are at increased risk for ...

  2. Fulminant Hepatitis - Topic Overview

    People who have fulminant hepatitis typically develop the symptoms seen in viral hepatitis and then rapidly (within hours,days,or occasionally weeks) develop severe,often life-threatening liver failure. Symptoms of severe liver failure include confusion,extreme irritability,altered consciousness (usually leading to unconsciousness or coma),blood-clotting defects,and buildup of fluid in ...

  3. Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) for Chronic Hepatitis B

    Drug details for Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for chronic hepatitis B.

  4. Hepatitis A Virus Test

    Hepatitis A virus tests detect substances in the blood that indicate a hepatitis infection is active or has occurred in the past. The test detects proteins (antibodies) made by the body in response to the virus that causes hepatitis.

  5. Hepatitis C Virus Tests

    Hepatitis C virus tests detect substances in the blood that indicate a hepatitis infection is active, chronic, or has occurred in the past. The tests detect proteins (antibodies) or genetic material (DNA or RNA) of the virus that causes hepatitis.

  6. Hepatitis B Virus Tests

    Hepatitis B virus tests look for substances in the blood that show a hepatitis infection is active, ongoing (chronic), or has occurred in the past. The tests look for antigens, antibodies, or genetic material (DNA) of the virus that causes hepatitis.

  7. Hepatitis C Tests

    WebMD describes the various tests used to diagnose a hepatitis C infection and the amount of damage to the liver.

  8. Hepatitis C Genotypes - Topic Overview

    Six major strains (genotypes) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) cause infection. You may be infected with more than one genotype at a time.Genotype 1 is the most common strain in the United States.Genotypes 1, 2, and 3 are found worldwide.Genotype 4 is found throughout northern Africa.Genotype 5 commonly is found in South Africa.Genotype 6 is common in Asia.Genotype testing is done with a blood test.How genotype affects treatmentAlthough genotype tests are not used to diagnose HCV infection, they may be done before treatment begins. Knowing the genotype may help a doctor choose the best treatment plan. You should know your genotype before treatment starts.Antiviral medicines are more likely to work for people who have genotype 2 or 3. If blood tests show that you have responded to antiviral therapy (the virus is not detected in your blood) after 6 months, treatment may be:Continued for another 6 months, if you are infected with genotype 1.Stopped, if you are infected with genotype 2 or

  9. Hepatitis B and C: Risk of Liver Cancer - Health Tools

    Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.Decision Points focus on key medical care decisions that are important to many health problems. Hepatitis B: Should I Take Antiviral Medicine for Chronic Hepatitis B?

  10. Hepatitis C: Your Risk for Cirrhosis - Topic Overview

    Up to 85% of people who are infected with the hepatitis C virus will develop long-term (chronic) infection.1 About 25% of people who have chronic hepatitis C will go on to develop cirrhosis—severe liver damage and scarring—after a period of about 20 years or more.2Certain factors may affect how quickly problems such as cirrhosis or liver cancer develop.The way cirrhosis develops depends on:3How much liver damage you had when you were diagnosed and how long you have had the infection. The amount of liver damage you have compared with how long you have had hepatitis C can help determine how likely it is that you will develop cirrhosis.Your age when you were infected. People who are older than 40 when they become infected may develop cirrhosis more quickly. How much alcohol you drink. People who drink too much alcohol (heavy drinking) can develop cirrhosis much more quickly than people with who do not drink or who drink very little alcohol.Your gender. Men may develop cirrhosis more

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