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Hepatitis Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Hepatitis

  1. Hepatitis C: Your Risk for Cirrhosis - Topic Overview

    Up to 85% of people who are infected with the hepatitis C virus will develop long-term (chronic) infection.1 About 25% of people who have chronic hepatitis C will go on to develop cirrhosis—severe liver damage and scarring—after a period of about 20 years or more.2Certain factors may affect how quickly problems such as cirrhosis or liver cancer develop.The way cirrhosis develops depends on:3How much liver damage you had when you were diagnosed and how long you have had the infection. The amount of liver damage you have compared with how long you have had hepatitis C can help determine how likely it is that you will develop cirrhosis.Your age when you were infected. People who are older than 40 when they become infected may develop cirrhosis more quickly. How much alcohol you drink. People who drink too much alcohol (heavy drinking) can develop cirrhosis much more quickly than people with who do not drink or who drink very little alcohol.Your gender. Men may develop cirrhosis more

  2. Hepatitis C Home Test - Topic Overview

    You may prefer to find out on your own whether you have been infected with the hepatitis C virus.You can buy a home test called a Home Access Hepatitis C Check kit, which you can find in most drugstores. The kit contains a sharp instrument (lancet) that you use to draw a small amount of blood from your fingertip.You place the sample on a piece of collection paper and mail it in a prepaid envelope to a lab for testing. After 10 days, you can call a toll-free number and receive your results using your confidential identification number. If the test shows you have hepatitis C, it is important to make an appointment with your doctor to discuss the results. The home test only looks for hepatitis C antibodies, which indicate that you have been exposed to the virus in the past. The test does not tell you if you currently have an infection. Your doctor can order another test that looks for hepatitis C virus RNA. This test can tell if you have an active infection now. Additional testing can

  3. Liver Function Tests

    These blood tests are used to determine whether your liver is damaged or inflamed. Although these tests help your doctor evaluate how well your liver is working, they do not confirm hepatitis C.Tests that assess liver functionYour doctor may do tests to measure your levels of certain chemicals produced by the liver. These tests can help your doctor know how well your liver is working. Tests may ..

  4. Hepatitis Panel - Topic Overview

    A hepatitis panel is a blood test used to find antigens, antibodies, or the genetic material (DNA or RNA) of the viruses that cause hepatitis. Hepatitis causes inflammation of the liver.Your doctor may order a hepatitis panel if you have symptoms of hepatitis. Symptoms of hepatitis include fever, vomiting, abdominal pain, yellowing of your eyes or skin (jaundice), dark yellow urine, and feeling ..

  5. Enlarged Liver (Hepatomegaly)

    WebMD explains the causes and symptoms of an enlarged liver.

  6. Hepatitis B: How to Avoid Spreading the Virus - Topic Overview

    The following tips can help you prevent the spread of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Inform the people you live with and/or have sex with about your illness as soon as possible. If you have long-term (chronic) HBV infection,you can infect others with the virus even if you have no symptoms of illness. Do not donate blood or blood products,organs,semen,or eggs (ova). Stop all sexual activity ...

  7. Hepatitis Immunoglobulin (HBIG) - Topic Overview

    Hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) is a solution of antibodies that are able to attach to liver cells and prevent the hepatitis B virus from infecting the cells. An injection of HBIG may help prevent HBV infection if it is given within 14 days of exposure to the virus when you: Have not been immunized against HBV but have come in contact with the blood or body fluids ( semen or vaginal fluids,...

  8. Hepatitis E - Topic Overview

    What is hepatitis E? Hepatitis E is a virus that can infect the liver. Unlike other forms of hepatitis,the hepatitis E virus doesn't lead to long-term illness or serious liver damage. Most people get well within a few months. How is hepatitis E spread? People usually get hepatitis E by drinking water or eating food that’s been contaminated by feces (stool) from someone infected with hepatitis ...

  9. Hepatitis B and C: Risk of Liver Cancer - Topic Overview

    People who are infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV) virus may develop a chronic infection that can lead to cirrhosis. The damage that results increases the risk of liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma). The risk of liver cancer may be as high as 200 times greater for people who have chronic HBV or HCV infection than for the general population. 1 If you have chronic HBV ...

  10. Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) for Chronic Hepatitis B

    Drug details for Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for chronic hepatitis B.

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