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Hepatitis Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Hepatitis

  1. Physical Exam for Hepatitis C - Topic Overview

    Your doctor will do a physical exam to look for signs of hepatitis C infection. The exam will include:Taking your temperature to see whether you have a fever.Feeling the upper part of your belly to see whether your liver or spleen is enlarged.Feeling the glands in your neck, under your arms, and in your groin to see whether they are swollen.Your doctor also may check for the following signs of advanced liver disease:Yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes (jaundice)Appearance of clusters of blood vessels just below the skin that look like tiny red spiders. These usually appear on the chest and shoulders.Redness on the palms of the hands caused by expansion of small blood vessels Fluid in the bellySwelling of the legs and feet Varicose veins spreading out from the navel

  2. Hepatitis C Home Test - Topic Overview

    You may prefer to find out on your own whether you have been infected with the hepatitis C virus.You can buy a home test called a Home Access Hepatitis C Check kit, which you can find in most drugstores. The kit contains a sharp instrument (lancet) that you use to draw a small amount of blood from your fingertip.You place the sample on a piece of collection paper and mail it in a prepaid envelope to a lab for testing. After 10 days, you can call a toll-free number and receive your results using your confidential identification number. If the test shows you have hepatitis C, it is important to make an appointment with your doctor to discuss the results. The home test only looks for hepatitis C antibodies, which indicate that you have been exposed to the virus in the past. The test does not tell you if you currently have an infection. Your doctor can order another test that looks for hepatitis C virus RNA. This test can tell if you have an active infection now. Additional testing can

  3. Enlarged Liver (Hepatomegaly)

    WebMD explains the causes and symptoms of an enlarged liver.

  4. Hepatitis B and C: Risk of Liver Cancer - Topic Overview

    People who are infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV) virus may develop a chronic infection that can lead to cirrhosis. The damage that results increases the risk of liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma). The risk of liver cancer may be as high as 200 times greater for people who have chronic HBV or HCV infection than for the general population. 1 If you have chronic HBV ...

  5. Liver Transplant for Hepatitis B - Topic Overview

    During a liver transplant,your damaged liver is removed and replaced with a healthy one from an organ donor. Liver transplantation is done to treat long-term (chronic) hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection only after all other treatments have not worked,because transplanted organs can become reinfected with HBV. Recurrent infections are often severe,leading to rapid failure of the transplanted ...

  6. Hepatitis Immunoglobulin (HBIG) - Topic Overview

    Hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) is a solution of antibodies that are able to attach to liver cells and prevent the hepatitis B virus from infecting the cells. An injection of HBIG may help prevent HBV infection if it is given within 14 days of exposure to the virus when you: Have not been immunized against HBV but have come in contact with the blood or body fluids ( semen or vaginal fluids,...

  7. Hepatitis B: Postvaccination Test for Immunity - Topic Overview

    A postvaccination test for immunity to the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is recommended only if you: Have an impaired immune system. This can be caused by many things,such as infection with HIV or the use of medicines to prevent organ rejection. Are older than age 49. Received the hepatitis B vaccine in the buttock. (The vaccine is less effective when given in the buttock. It is more effective ...

  8. Interferons for Chronic Hepatitis B

    Drug details for Interferons for chronic hepatitis B.

  9. Hepatitis B Treatment Recommendations - Topic Overview

    The American Association for the Study of Liver Disease has made recommendations for treating long-term (chronic) hepatitis B. These recommendations are based on the presence of hepatitis B antigens in your blood,the level of hepatitis B viral DNA ( HBV DNA ) in your blood,and the levels of your liver enzymes. Chronic hepatitis B can be HBeAg-positive or -negative. This means a specific ...

  10. Hepatitis E - Topic Overview

    What is hepatitis E? Hepatitis E is a virus that can infect the liver. Unlike other forms of hepatitis,the hepatitis E virus doesn't lead to long-term illness or serious liver damage. Most people get well within a few months. How is hepatitis E spread? People usually get hepatitis E by drinking water or eating food that’s been contaminated by feces (stool) from someone infected with hepatitis ...

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