Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Quiz: Myths and Facts About Hepatitis C

  1 of  
Current Score:  
Loading..Please Wait
slide image

Hepatitis C is rare.

slide image

Hepatitis C is rare.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Some 3.2 million Americans have hepatitis C, and about 17,000 more are infected each year. Hepatitis C is the most common infection in the U.S. that is spread through blood. Hepatitis B is also commonly spread through blood. Hepatitis A is usually spread through food or water. All three forms are caused by viruses.

slide image

The liver is the body part most affected by hepatitis C.

slide image

The liver is the body part most affected by hepatitis C.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

"Hepatitis" means inflammation of the liver. In addition to a virus, hepatitis can also result from overuse of drugs or alcohol, illnesses, medications, or even an immune disorder.

 

The liver's jobs are to clean your blood, help digest fats, and store energy. A liver that's swollen and damaged by hepatitis C slowly stops working as it should.

 

Hepatitis C can stay active in your body and slowly damage the liver over time. This is called chronic hepatitis C. You may develop cirrhosis, a condition in which most of the liver has been destroyed and has become scar tissue.

The first symptom of hepatitis C is a high fever.

The first symptom of hepatitis C is a high fever.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Hepatitis C usually doesn't cause any symptoms. If it isn't diagnosed, it can take as long as 30 years for serious signs of liver damage to develop.

 

Some people can have symptoms such as nausea or vomiting. But because these symptoms can be signs of so many other things, it's best to ask your doctor to test you. If you have hepatitis C, you can spread the virus even if you aren't having symptoms.

Teenagers are most likely to have hepatitis C.

Teenagers are most likely to have hepatitis C.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Baby boomers -- people born from 1945 to 1965 -- have the highest rates of hepatitis C. It may be that they became infected in the '70s and '80s when hepatitis C rates were high and blood wasn't screened as well as it is now.

 

The CDC says all boomers should be tested, along with anyone who ever used illegal drugs, had blood transfusions before 1992, or has HIV or liver disease symptoms. If you think you've been exposed to hepatitis C, talk to your doctor about getting tested.

You can get hepatitis C by having sex.

You can get hepatitis C by having sex.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

It isn't easy to get infected with hepatitis C through sex, but it's still possible. If you have multiple partners or if you or your partner has hepatitis C, it's a good idea to use a latex condom.

 

You're more likely to get hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. Health care workers sometimes get it from needle injuries.

Getting tattoos and piercings can put you at risk for hepatitis C.

Getting tattoos and piercings can put you at risk for hepatitis C.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Your chances of having problems at a licensed, commercial facility are slim. But tattoos or piercings done with nonsterile instruments can spread hepatitis C.

 

If you get a tattoo or piercing, look for a facility that works with all single-use items like gloves, needles, and ink pots. The shop should properly dispose of all items that have touched blood, use a disinfecting solution to clean work areas, and sterilize reusable tools.

A vaccine can prevent hepatitis C.

A vaccine can prevent hepatitis C.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

There are vaccines for hepatitis A and B, but there isn't one for hepatitis C. To keep from getting infected, avoid contact with other people's blood. Don't share personal items like razors and toothbrushes, especially with someone who has hepatitis C.

 

Hepatitis C cannot be spread by hugging, kissing, coughing, sneezing, or breastfeeding. Unlike hepatitis A, you can’t get hepatitis C from food or water.

Hepatitis C usually goes away on its own.

Hepatitis C usually goes away on its own.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

A few people's bodies will clear the virus without any treatment, but 75% or more won't. If you have hepatitis C, it often lasts your whole life. The sooner your hepatitis is diagnosed and you can begin treatment, the better your chance to prevent more liver damage.

Hepatitis C can be treated with medication.

Hepatitis C can be treated with medication.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Medications called antivirals are used to treat hepatitis C. Your doctor will choose treatment based on how healthy your liver is and other conditions you might have. You'll be vaccinated for hepatitis B and tested for HIV.

 

If you have hepatitis C, ask your doctor before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, supplements, or vitamins. And don't drink alcohol, because it can speed up liver damage.

Once you've been treated for hepatitis C, you can’t get it again.

Once you've been treated for hepatitis C, you can’t get it again.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Even after successful treatment, you can still be infected again with hepatitis C. The chance is lower, but it's still there.

Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.
Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.

Great job. You're well-informed about hepatitis C.

Not bad, but you could learn more. Read up on hepatitis C, and test your knowledge again.

Hepatitis C is a confusing topic. Read up and test your knowledge again.

Today on WebMD

Hepatitus C virus
Slideshow
young couple
Article
 
Hepatitis Basics
Article
Hepatitis Prevent 10
Article
 
Hepatitis C Treatment
Article
Syringes and graph illustration
Tool
 
liver illustration
Quiz
passport, pills and vaccine
Slideshow
 
Scientist looking in microscope
Slideshow
Fatty Liver Disease
Article
 
Digestive Diseases Liver Transplantation
Article
Picture Of The Liver
Image Collection
 

WebMD Special Sections