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HIV & AIDS Health Center

Medical Reference Related to HIV & AIDS

  1. CD4+ Cells - Health Tools

    Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.Decision Points focus on key medical care decisions that are important to many health problems. HIV: When Should I Start Taking Antiretroviral Medicines for HIV Infection?Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing a health condition. HIV: Taking Antiretroviral Drugs

  2. HIV and Fatigue - Topic Overview

    Feeling tired is common if you have HIV,especially if you have had the virus for many years. Being severely tired can affect your ability to work,take care of yourself,and enjoy your life. There can be many reasons why you are tired. It is important that you and your health professional try to find the cause. Many of the things that cause fatigue can be treated,and you may feel better. ...

  3. HIV and Weight Loss - Topic Overview

    Weight loss in people with HIV has many possible causes. If you lose weight fast,it may be because you have another infection along with HIV. This type of illness is called an opportunistic infection. Gradual weight loss may be due to problems with nutrition. You may lose weight if you cannot eat enough food or if your body cannot absorb all the nutrients from the food you eat. Pain in your ...

  4. HIV and Cytomegalovirus - Topic Overview

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a herpes-type virus that can cause fever,chills,sore throat,swollen glands,body aches,and fatigue. In people who have AIDS,CMV most often infects the eye (CMV retinitis),the esophagus (esophagitis),and the intestines (colitis). CMV can also cause pneumonia or liver inflammation (hepatitis). A CMV infection can be fatal. CMV retinitis occurs in up to 40% of ...

  5. Resistance to HIV Medicines - Health Tools

    Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing a health condition. HIV: Taking Antiretroviral Drugs

  6. HIV Viral Load - Topic Overview

    Viral load is a measurement of how much HIV is present in your blood. A sample of blood is drawn and sent to a lab for testing. Results are expressed as the number of copies of the virus per milliliter of blood. Each virus is called a "copy" because HIV reproduces by making copies of itself (replicating). The viral load test gives a more accurate picture of what the virus is doing in your ...

  7. HIV: Risks of Sexual Contact - Topic Overview

    During vaginal,oral,or anal sex,the receiving partner has the higher risk of contracting HIV. Men who allow other men to perform anal sex on them have the highest risk. The inserting male partner has a lower risk,but the risk increases if he is uncircumcised. Women who have vaginal or anal sex with infected men are also in danger. The risk decreases with the use of condoms. HIV can be ...

  8. HIV: Why Healthy Eating Matters - Topic Overview

    Eating a nutritious,balanced diet is an important part of treating HIV. Good nutrition can help your immune system stay strong,which in turn may help your body fight HIV. Knowing the best way to nourish your body will help keep it strong and allow your HIV medications to work effectively. It is important to maintain lean muscle mass while fighting HIV. Maintaining a healthy weight can be a ...

  9. HIV Home Care - Topic Overview

    If a person's HIV infection progresses,you may be called on to provide home care for that person. A home care course may give you the knowledge,skills,and confidence to provide the care needed. Contact your local Red Cross chapter,Visiting Nurse Association,or AIDS service agency to find out about home care training offered in your area. When possible,get to know the person's doctor,...

  10. HIV: Preventing Infections - Topic Overview

    Medicines and vaccines are used to prevent infections and certain diseases (opportunistic infections) that are more common in people with HIV.Primary prevention means preventing illness before it occurs. Immunizations (vaccines) are one kind of primary prevention. Medicines that kill or control the organisms that cause infections are another type of primary prevention.Secondary prevention means preventing a disease that a person has already had from coming back. This is usually done with medicines that slow or prevent the growth of the organisms that cause infections.Generally, infection with HIV doesn't make people sick, except for the flu-like illness that may develop shortly after they become infected. Most people who are infected with HIV get sick because their immune systems become weak and cannot fight off other infections. So preventing opportunistic infections is an important part of treatment for HIV.If you have been diagnosed with HIV infection, make sure that you and your

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