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Encephalitis

Encephalitis is an inflammation (swelling and irritation) of the brain that is usually the result of a viral infection. If not treated immediately, encephalitis can alter brain function and become life-threatening.

The most common symptoms of encephalitis are fever, severe headache, and confusion. Other symptoms may develop, such as sensitivity to light, nausea and vomiting, stiff neck and back, and drowsiness. Sometimes severe symptoms develop, such as seizures, tremors, personality changes, and even coma. In general, symptoms that develop suddenly and are serious from the start usually mean a more severe, life-threatening form of encephalitis.

Encephalitis is most often caused by a virus, such as the virus that causes cold sores and genital herpes (herpes simplex), mumps, measles, chickenpox, mononucleosis (Epstein-Barr virus), influenza, or German measles (rubella). Although very rare in the United States, encephalitis may be spread by infected mosquitoes and ticks.

Treatment usually includes hospitalization and use of the antiviral medicine acyclovir along with supportive care for symptoms.

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerE. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerW. David Colby IV, MSc, MD, FRCPC - Infectious Disease
Last RevisedOctober 26, 2011

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: October 26, 2011
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