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Genetic Counselor

Working as part of a team of doctors and other health professionals, genetic counselors provide education and support to families with members who have birth defects or genetic disorders such as sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis, or hemophilia. They also look at patterns to see how likely a couple is to have a child who has a genetic problem.

Genetic counselors have graduate degrees and experience in the areas of medical genetics and counseling. Many genetic counselors have worked in other areas, such as nursing, psychology, public health, or social work.

Licensing, certification, and registration requirements for genetic counselors vary from state to state.

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerAnne C. Poinier, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerE. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Last RevisedAugust 17, 2012

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: August 17, 2012
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