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Integrated Test During Pregnancy

The integrated test is a screening test done during pregnancy to find out the chance that a baby has certain birth defects, such as Down syndrome. The test is done in two stages at two different times during the pregnancy. You will get the results after the tests in the second trimester are done.

  • The first stage can be done around 10 to 13 weeks of pregnancy. The tests done for this stage are:
    • An ultrasound. The ultrasound can show the age of the baby and measure the thickness of the skin at the back of the baby's neck (nuchal translucency, or NT).
    • Blood tests done to measure the level of two substances in the blood called pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) and beta-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (beta-hCG).
  • The second stage can usually be done between weeks 15 and 20. The tests done for this stage are all blood tests and include:

The results of all these tests are reviewed to see if levels are higher or lower than expected, and the results are reported after the second stage.

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerSarah Marshall, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerSiobhan M. Dolan, MD, MPH - Reproductive Genetics
Last RevisedApril 4, 2012

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: April 04, 2012
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.