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Saturated Fats

Saturated fats are those that become hard at room temperature. They are found mostly in animal-based foods (such as meat, butter, milk, and cheese) and in coconut oil, palm oil, and cocoa butter.

Saturated fats should only be eaten in limited amounts because they harm blood vessels, which increases a person's risk for developing hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis). Saturated fats also affect the levels of cholesterol in the blood and increase the risk of developing coronary artery disease.

Most of a person's fat calories should be from monounsaturated fats (such as from olive oil, peanut oil, avocados, and nuts) or polyunsaturated fats (such as from liquid vegetable oils, corn oil, or soybean oil).

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerKathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerRhonda O'Brien, MS, RD, CDE - Certified Diabetes Educator
Last RevisedJanuary 25, 2013

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: January 25, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.