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Shock in Children

Shock may quickly occur after a sudden illness or injury. When the body loses too much blood or fluid, there is no longer enough fluid in the body to carry enough blood to the vital organs.

A child may be in shock if one or more of the following signs are present:

  • Passing out (losing consciousness)
  • Acting confused. The child may not know where he or she is.
  • Being very sleepy or hard to wake up
  • Breathing fast
  • Not responding to being touched or talked to

Also, a child in shock has a weak, rapid heart rate and low blood pressure.

Shock is a life-threatening condition. Immediate medical care is required any time shock is suspected.

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer William H. Blahd, Jr., MD, FACEP - Emergency Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer H. Michael O'Connor, MD - Emergency Medicine
Current as of June 6, 2012

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: June 06, 2012
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.