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    High Blood Pressure and the Heart

    How Does Blood Flow Through the Heart?

    The right and left sides of the heart work together. The pattern described below is repeated over and over, causing blood to flow continuously to the heart, lungs, and body.

    Right side of the heart

    • Blood enters the heart through two large veins, the inferior and superior vena cava, emptying oxygen-poor blood from the body into the right atrium.
    • As the atrium contracts, blood flows from your right atrium into your right ventricle through the open tricuspid valve.
    • When the ventricle is full, the tricuspid valve shuts. This prevents blood from flowing backward into the right atrium while the ventricle contracts.
    • As the ventricle contracts, blood leaves the heart through the pulmonic valve, into the pulmonary artery and to the lungs, where it is oxygenated. The oxygenated blood then returns to the heart through the pulmonary veins.

    Left side of the heart

    • The pulmonary veins empty oxygen-rich blood from the lungs into the left atrium.
    • As the atrium contracts, blood flows from your left atrium into your left ventricle through the open mitral valve.
    • When the ventricle is full, the mitral valve shuts. This prevents blood from flowing backward into the atrium while the ventricle contracts.
    • As the ventricle contracts, blood leaves the heart through the aortic valve, into the aorta and to the body.

    How Does Blood Flow Through Your Lungs?

    Once blood travels through the pulmonic valve, it enters your lungs. This is called the pulmonary circulation. From your pulmonic valve, blood travels to the pulmonary arteries and eventually to tiny capillary vessels in the lungs.

    Here, oxygen travels from the tiny air sacs in the lungs, through the walls of the capillaries, into the blood. At the same time, carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism, passes from the blood into the air sacs. Carbon dioxide leaves the body when you exhale. Once the blood is oxygenated, it travels back to the left atrium through the pulmonary veins.

    What Are the Coronary Arteries?

    Like all organs, your heart is made of tissue that requires a supply of oxygen and nutrients. Although its chambers are full of blood, the heart receives no nourishment from this blood. The heart receives its own supply of blood from a network of arteries, called the coronary arteries.

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