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Blood Pressure Screening - Topic Overview

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening for adults 18 and older for high blood pressure.1

Tests and programs for high blood pressure vary widely in reliability. Results from automated blood pressure testing, such as you might do at a grocery store or pharmacy, may not be accurate. Any high blood pressure measurement discovered during a blood pressure screening program needs to be confirmed by a doctor or another health professional.

Recommended Related to Heart Health

Understanding Low Blood Pressure -- Diagnosis and Treatment

Low blood pressure is not always a sign of a problem. But if you have symptoms of low blood pressure, your doctor can diagnose the condition and uncover the cause. Symptoms of dizziness and lightheadedness when you stand up from sitting or lying down -- with a decrease in your blood pressure -- may indicate a condition called postural hypotension. A wide range of underlying conditions may also cause your symptoms. It's important to identify the cause of low blood pressure so appropriate treatment...

Read the Understanding Low Blood Pressure -- Diagnosis and Treatment article > >

Rechecking blood pressure

Your doctor can let you know how often you should get your blood pressure checked. It may depend on what your blood pressure is and your risk for heart disease. You can get your blood pressure checked during any routine medical visit.

  • Healthy adults who have a blood pressure below 120/80 might have their blood pressure checked at least every 1 to 2 years.
  • Adults who are prehypertensive (120–139 and/or 80–89) should have their blood pressure checked as often as recommended by their doctor or at least yearly.
  • Adults with other risk factors for heart disease or evidence of disease caused by high blood pressure need to have their blood pressure checked more often.

For more information, see the topics High Blood Pressure, Prehypertension, and Home Blood Pressure Test.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: March 12, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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