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Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Health Center

Living with IBS: One Young Woman's Story

Irritable bowel syndrome can be painful and embarrassing. Here's how one woman copes.
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By Stephanie Anderson
And Stephanie Adams
WebMD Magazine - Feature

I've had the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome -- a gastrointestinal disorder -- for my whole life, but when I was younger, I didn't realize anything was wrong. My parents thought my cramps, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea were normal because they had similar symptoms. So I thought it was normal, too. As I grew up, I pretty much just coped with it. It was inconvenient, but I did my best.

But three years ago, when I was 27, after having some minor surgery done, I had the worst symptoms ever. I had severe stomach cramps and was in pain all the time. I had a lot of diarrhea. I think it was the stress around the surgery that triggered this flare, but it went on for months and months. Finally I went to my doctor, who sent me to a gastroenterologist.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Symptom Journal

An irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptom journal can help you and your doctor figure out what triggers your IBS, and how to deal with those triggers. Fill this out as soon as you experience symptoms. Print extra copies to have on hand. Remember, a variety of factors can set off IBS: Certain types of food, the volume of food, stress, medicines, your menstrual cycle, and your environment. You may find, for instance, that you tend to feel bloated after eating snacks during office meetings. Knowing...

Read the Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Symptom Journal article > >

At first he thought I had acid reflux, but the medication he prescribed actually gave me acid reflux, so that didn't work. After having an ultrasound and an upper GI endoscopy, which is an examination with a small camera that visualizes the esophagus, stomach, and upper part of the intestines, I was diagnosed with IBS. I had more tests earlier this year and discovered that I also have a problem with fat absorption. The doctor who ran the lab told me I needed to start a gluten- and dairy-free diet.

Surviving the Gluten-Free Diet

Gluten is the protein part of wheat and lots of other grains, as well as starch and other fillers found in processed foods and medications. I already knew a lot about this kind of diet from my research, and all along was fascinated with the whole approach. Until, that is, I realized I had to try it myself. I panicked. I was talking about not eating gluten for the rest of my life. The permanence of it hit me hard. I felt overwhelmed.

But I'm finding the transition easier than I expected. I stay away from processed food, unless it's labeled "gluten free" (and there's more and more of that available now). Otherwise, I find it's easier to cook from scratch. I've learned there are 30 gluten-free flours to use; Italians cook a lot with non-gluten flours, such as polenta and garbanzo. I'm also staying away from MSG, which I think triggers my symptoms. I'm finding a lot of fun dairy substitutes, and having success with baking. And the diet is working for me. I have fewer IBS symptoms and am just generally feeling healthier.

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