Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Health Center

Font Size

More Upsetting News About Irritable Bowel Treatment

continued...

 

But the argument goes both ways. Other experts say that drugs like Lotronex are needed desperately, even though IBS is not a life-threatening condition.

 

Prior to the approval of Lotronex in February 2000, physicians recommended psychiatric treatment or a change in lifestyle as ways to treat IBS. But to assume that these treatments are sufficient is to ignore a major quality-of-life issue that can be debilitating, Harris Clearfield, MD, a professor of medicine at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia, recently told WebMD. "I would also take issue with the notion that IBS is often misdiagnosed," he said.

 

Lotronex, which is approved for women whose predominate symptom is diarrhea, is the first drug to be approved for IBS in decades. The FDA is now expected to approve another IBS drug called Zelmac (tegaserod), which probably will be launched in the first half of 2001.

 

But even then, Public Citizen is expected to protest that approval because the drug has been associated with ovarian cysts.

 

"Right now, it looks like there is a lack of effectiveness and a real risk of side effects" associated with these drugs, Sasich told WebMD in an interview.

1|2|3

Today on WebMD

what is ibs
Slideshow
lactose intolerance
Slideshow
 
Finding Right Diet IBS
Article
myth and facts about constipation
Slideshow
 
IBS Trigger Foods
Video
Supplements for IBS What Works
Article
 
IBS Symptoms Quiz
Quiz
digestive health
Slideshow
 
gluten free diet
Slideshow
digestive myths
Slideshow
 
what causes diarrhea
Video
top foods for probiotics
Slideshow
 

WebMD Special Sections