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Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Health Center

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Who Is at Risk for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)?

It is not clear what causes irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, but certain factors seem to make some people more vulnerable than others. Risk factors for IBS include:

  • Sex. About twice as many women as men suffer from IBS, reports the American College of Gastroenterology. Researchers aren't sure why this is so, but they suspect that changing hormones in the female menstrual cycle may have something to do with it.
  • Age. IBS can affect people of all ages, but it is more likely to occur in people in their teens through their 40s. Studies estimate IBS affects 10% to 15% of the adult population.
  • Emotional trouble. Some IBS patients appear to be stressed, have a psychiatric disorder, or have experienced some sort of a traumatic event such as sexual abuse or domestic violence. It is not clear what comes first -- the emotional turmoil or the IBS. Nevertheless, there's evidence that stress management and behavioral therapy help relieve symptoms in some IBS sufferers.
  • Food sensitivities. Some people may have digestive systems that rumble angrily with consumption of dairy, wheat, fructose (a simple sugar found in fruits), or sorbitol (a sugar substitute). Eating certain fare such as fatty foods, carbonated drinks, and alcohol can also invite chronic digestive upset. There's no proof any of these edibles cause IBS, but they may trigger symptoms.
  • Eating large meals, or eating while doing a stressful activity, such as driving or working in front of the computer. Again, these activities do not cause IBS, but for the hypersensitive colon, they can spell trouble.
  • Taking certain medications. Studies have shown an association between IBS symptoms and antibiotics, antidepressants, and drugs containing sorbitol.
  • Experiencing "traveler's diarrhea" or food poisoning. There is a controversy over whether these events may trigger the first onset of IBS symptoms.

Talk to your doctor if you suspect you might have IBS. There are various treatments available for IBS with constipation and IBS with diarrhea that may make your life easier.

Recommended Related to Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Stress, Anxiety, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

It is not entirely clear how stress, anxiety, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are related -- or which one comes first -- but studies show they tend to co-exist. "If you do diagnostic interviews, what you find is that about 60% of IBS patients will meet the criteria for one or more psychiatric disorders," says Edward Blanchard, PhD, professor of psychology at the State University of New York at Albany. The most common mental ailment suffered by people with IBS is generalized anxiety disorder...

Read the Stress, Anxiety, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) article > >

 

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, DO, MS on August 13, 2014

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