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Hysteroscopy

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How It Is Done continued...

Your doctor will insert a lubricated tool called a speculum into your vagina. The speculumcamera.gif gently spreads apart the vaginal walls so your doctor can see inside the vagina and the cervix. Your vagina will be cleaned with a special soap.

The hysteroscope will be placed at the entrance to your vagina and gently moved through the cervix into your uterus. A gas or liquid will be put through the hysteroscope into your uterus to help your doctor see the lining clearly. Your doctor looks through the hysteroscope at a magnified view of the lining of your uterus. Your doctor can also see the uterine openings of the fallopian tubes. A video screen may be used during the test.

If a biopsy or other procedure is done, your doctor will use small tools through the hysteroscope. A hysteroscopy takes about 30 minutes, unless other procedures are being done.

How It Feels

If you are given a sedative or a local or regional anesthesia, you may have some cramping during the test. If you have general anesthesia, you may have a tickling, dry throat, slight hoarseness, or a mild sore throat after the test; these symptoms may last several days. Throat lozenges and warm saltwater gargles can help relieve the throat symptoms.

Some women feel dizzy and sick to their stomachs. This is called a vasovagal reaction. This feeling will go away after a few minutes.

You may need to avoid sexual intercourse, using tampons, or playing sports for a while after hysteroscopy. Talk to your doctor about when you can resume normal activities.

Risks

If a fluid is used during the test to help your doctor see the uterine lining clearly, you may absorb some fluid and feel bloated. It may also change the level of sodium in your blood. If gas is used, you have a small risk for an air bubble (air embolism) in a blood vessel, though this is very rare.

A hysteroscopy can cause injury to the uterus or cervix, an infection, or bleeding. In rare cases, the uterus, bladder, or bowel can be punctured during the test, requiring surgical repair. If general anesthesia is used, there is a small risk of problems from the anesthesia.

After the test

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: March 12, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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