Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Infertility & Reproduction Health Center

Select An Article
Font Size



Risks continued...

Right after the test, you will be taken to a recovery area where nurses will care for and observe you. Usually you will stay in the recovery area for 1 to 4 hours, and then you will be moved to a hospital room or you will go home. In addition to any special instructions from your doctor, your nurse will explain information to help you in your recovery. You will likely go home with a sheet of care instructions and who to call if you have any problems.

It is normal to have a small amount of vaginal bleeding for a day or so after a hysteroscopy. You also may have some mild belly pain if a gas was used during the test. This should go away in 24 hours. You can take acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) to relieve the pain.

Follow any instructions your doctor gave you. Call your doctor if you have:

  • Heavy vaginal bleeding or discharge (more than a normal menstrual period).
  • A fever.
  • Severe belly or pelvic pain or cramping.
  • Problems urinating.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Vomiting.


A hysteroscopy is a way for your doctor to look at the lining of your uteruscamera.gif. He or she uses a thin viewing tool called a hysteroscope. Your doctor will talk to you about what he or she sees at the time of the hysteroscopy.


The inside of the uterus looks normal in size and shape.

No polyps, fibroids, or other growths are present.

Openings to the fallopian tubes look normal.


The size or shape of the inside of the uterus does not look normal.

Scar tissue is present in the uterus.

Uterine polyps, fibroids, or other growths are present.

A misplaced intrauterine device (IUD) is found and removed.

The uterine openings to one or both fallopian tubes are closed.

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: 2/, 014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Today on WebMD

Four pregnant women standing in a row
How much do you know about conception?
Couple with surrogate mother
Which one is right for you?
couple lying in grass holding hands
Why Dad's health matters.
couple viewing positive pregnancy test
6 ways to improve your chances.
Which Treatment Is Right For You
Conception Myths
eddleman prepare your body pregnancy
Charting Your Fertility Cycle
Fertility Specialist
Understanding Fertility Symptoms
invitro fertilization