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Infertility & Reproduction Health Center

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Infertility and Testicular Disorders

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How Successful Is Testicular Cancer Treatment?

The success of testicular cancer treatment depends on the stage of the disease when it is first detected and treated. If the cancer is found and treated before it spreads to the lymph nodes, the cure rate is very high, greater than 98%. Even after testicular cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, treatment is highly effective, with a cure rate greater than 90%.

What Should I Do to Prevent Testicular Cancer?

To prevent testicular cancer, all men should be familiar with the size and feel of their testicles, so they can detect any changes. Most doctors feel that recognizing a lump early is an important factor in the successful treatment of testicular cancer and recommend monthly testicular self-exams in combination with routine physical exams for all men after puberty.

What Is Epididymitis?

Epididymitis is inflammation of the epididymis. The epididymis is the coiled tube that lies on and around each testicle. It functions in the transport, storage, and maturation of sperm cells that are produced in the testicles. The epididymis connects the testicles with the vas deferens (the tubes that carry sperm).

What Causes Epididymitis?

Epididymitis often is caused by infection or by sexually transmitted diseases, including chlamydiaandgonorrhea. In men over 40 years of age, the most common cause is due to bacteria in the urinary tract.

What Are the Symptoms of Epididymitis?

Symptoms of epididymitis include scrotal pain and swelling. Discharge from the penis, painful urination, and painful intercourse or ejaculation may also be present. In severe cases, the infection can spread to the adjacent testicle, causing fever and abscess (collection of pus).

How Is Epididymitis Treated?

Treatment for epididymitis includes antibiotics (drugs that kill the bacteria causing the infection), bed rest, ice to reduce swelling, the use of a scrotal supporter, and anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDS such as ibuprofen). Partners will need to be treated if the epididymitis is due to a sexually transmitted infection to prevent re-infection.

If left untreated, epididymitis can produce scar tissue, which can block the sperm from leaving the testicle. This can cause problems with fertility, especially if both testicles are involved or if the man has recurring infections.

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