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    Kidney Stones Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Kidney Stones

    1. Kidney Stones - When To Call a Doctor

      Learn when to call a doctor about kidney stones.

    2. Kidney Stones - Prevention

      Get tips on preventing kidney stones, including drinking more fluids.

    3. Types of Kidney Stones - Topic Overview

      There are four main types of kidney stones. Calcium stones Nearly 80 out of 100 kidney stones (80%) are made of calcium compounds,especially calcium oxalate. 1 Calcium phosphate and other minerals also may be present. Conditions that cause high calcium levels in the body,such as hyperparathyroidism,increase the risk of calcium stones. High levels of oxalate also increase the risk for ...

    4. Ureteroscopy

      The surgeon, often a urologist, passes a thin viewing instrument (ureteroscope) through the tube from the bladder out of the body (urethra) into the bladder, and then into the ureter to the location of the kidney stone. He or she makes no cuts in the body.See an illustration of ureteroscopy.The urologist removes the kidney stone using an instrument with a "basket" to grab the stone or forceps. ...

    5. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) for Kidney Stones

      Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) uses sound waves (also called shock waves) to break a kidney stone into small pieces that can more easily travel through the urinary tract and pass from the body. See an illustration of ESWL.You lie on a water - filled cushion, and the surgeon uses X - rays or ultrasound tests to precisely locate the stone. High - energy sound waves pass through your bo

    6. Retrograde Pyelogram for Kidney Stones

      The retrograde pyelogram uses a dye to determine whether a kidney stone or something else is blocking your urinary tract. During the test, your doctor will insert a thin, lighted tube (cystoscope) into the urethra, which carries urine out of the body from the bladder. He or she will then put a catheter through the cystoscope and into a ureter, which carries urine from the kidney to the bladder. ..

    7. Kidney Stones - Surgery

      People rarely need open surgery to treat kidney stones. In most cases, other less invasive treatments are successful. You may need open surgery when the kidney stone is causing severe bleeding that cannot be controlled.

    8. Kidney Stones - Treatment Overview

      Learn about treatment for kidney stones, including waiting for the stone to pass, taking pain medicine, or having a procedure to remove the stone.

    9. Kidney Stones - What Happens

      A kidney stone begins as a tiny piece of mineral in the kidney. When the urine leaves the kidney, it may carry the mineral out, or the mineral may stay in the kidney. If the piece of mineral stays in the kidney, over time more small pieces of mineral join

    10. Open Surgery for Kidney Stones

      In open surgery to remove kidney stones, the surgeon uses an incision in the person's abdomen or side to reach the kidney and remove the stones.

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