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    Lung Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Lung Cancer

    1. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

      After small cell lung cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the chest or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. Some of the tests used to diagnose small cell lung cancer are also used to stage the disease. (See the General Information section.) Other tests and procedures that may be used in the staging process include the following:MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the brain: A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the brain,

    2. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062947-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment

    3. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Stage Information for Malignant Mesothelioma

      Patients with stage I disease have a significantly better prognosis than those with more advanced stages. Because of the relative rarity of this disease, exact survival information based upon stage is limited.[1]Definitions of TNMThe American Joint Committee on Cancer has designated staging by TNM classification to define malignant mesothelioma.[2]International Mesothelioma Interest Group Staging System for Diffuse Malignant Pleural MesotheliomaTable 1. Primary Tumor (T)aa Reprinted with permission from AJCC: Pleural mesothelioma. In: Edge SB, Byrd DR, Compton CC, et al., eds.: AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer, 2010, pp 271-7.TXPrimary tumor cannot be assessed.T0No evidence of primary tumor.T1Tumor limited to the ipsilateral parietal pleura with or without mediastinal pleura and with or without diaphragmatic pleural involvement.T1aNo involvement of the visceral pleura.T1bTumor also involving the visceral pleura.T2Tumor involving each of the ipsilateral

    4. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Stage IIIA NSCLC Treatment

      Patients with stage IIIA NSCLC are a heterogenous group. Patients may have metastases to ipsilateral mediastinal nodes, potentially resectable T3 tumors invading chest wall, or mediastinal involvement with metastases to peribronchial or hilar lymph nodes (N1). Presentations of disease range from resectable tumors with microscopic metastases to lymph nodes to unresectable, bulky disease involving multiple nodal stations.Prognosis:Patients with clinical stage IIIA-N2 disease have a 5-year overall survival rate of 10% to 15%; however, patients with bulky mediastinal involvement (i.e., visible on chest radiography) have a 5-year survival rate of 2% to 5%. Depending on clinical circumstances, the principal forms of treatment that are considered for patients with stage IIIA NSCLC are radiation therapy, chemotherapy, surgery, and combinations of these modalities. Treatment options vary according to the location of the tumor and

    5. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000258019-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Lung Cancer Screening

    6. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment

      Standard Treatment Options for Patients With Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC)Standard treatment options for patients with recurrent SCLC include the following:Chemotherapy.Palliative therapy.At the time of recurrence, many SCLC patients are potential candidates for further therapy.ChemotherapyAlthough second-line chemotherapy has been shown to produce tumor regression, responses are usually short lived; the median survival is rarely more than 12 months and usually less than 6 months after second-line therapy.[1] Response to first-line chemotherapy predicts for subsequent response to second-line therapy.As in other chemosensitive tumors (e.g., Hodgkin lymphoma and ovarian epithelial cancer), two main categories of patients receiving second-line chemotherapy have been described: sensitive and resistant. Sensitive patients have a first-line response that lasted more than 90 days after treatment was completed. These patients have the greatest benefit from second-line chemotherapy.

    7. Malignant Mesothelioma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

      Standard treatment for all but localized mesothelioma is generally not curative. Although some patients will experience long-term survival with aggressive treatment approaches, it remains unclear if overall survival (OS) has been significantly altered by the different treatment modalities or by combinations of modalities. Extrapleural pneumonectomy in selected patients with early stage disease may improve recurrence-free survival, but its impact on OS is unknown.[1] Pleurectomy and decortication can provide palliative relief from symptomatic effusions, discomfort caused by tumor burden, and pain caused by invasive tumor. (Refer to the PDQ summary on Pain for more information.) Operative mortality from pleurectomy/decortication is less than 2%,[2] while mortality from extrapleural pneumonectomy has ranged from 6% to 30%.[1,3]The addition of radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy following surgical intervention has not demonstrated improved survival.[2] The use of radiation therapy in

    8. Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

      Non-small cell lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The lungs are a pair of cone-shaped breathing organs in the chest. The lungs bring oxygen into the body as you breathe in. They release carbon dioxide,a waste product of the body’s cells,as you breathe out. Each lung has sections called lobes. The left lung has two lobes. The right ..

    9. Malignant Mesothelioma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

      Treatment of recurrent non-small cell lung cancer may include the following:External radiation therapy as palliative therapy, to relieve pain and other symptoms and improve the quality of life.Chemotherapy.Targeted therapy with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor.Laser therapy or internal radiation therapy using an endoscope.Radiosurgery (for certain patients who cannot have surgery).Surgery to remove a very small amount of cancer that has spread to the brain.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent non-small cell lung cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

    10. Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Questions or Comments About This Summary

      If you have questions or comments about this summary, please send them to Cancer.gov through the Web site's Contact Form. We can respond only to email messages written in English.

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