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Lung Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Lung Cancer

  1. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Recurrent NSCLC Treatment

    Standard Treatment Options for Recurrent NSCLCStandard treatment options for recurrent NSCLC include the following: Radiation therapy (for palliation).[1]Chemotherapy or kinase inhibitors alone, including the following for patients who have previously received platinum chemotherapy:Docetaxel.[2,3]Pemetrexed.[3]Erlotinib after failure of both platinum-based and docetaxel chemotherapies.[4]Gefitinib.[5]Crizotinib for EML4-ALK translocations.[6,7]EGFR inhibitors in patients with or without EGFR mutations.EML4-ALK inhibitors in patients with EML-ALK translocations.Surgical resection of isolated cerebral metastasis (for highly selected patients).[8]Laser therapy or interstitial radiation therapy (for endobronchial lesions).[9]Stereotactic radiation surgery (for highly selected patients).[10,11]Radiation therapy may provide excellent palliation of symptoms from a localized tumor mass.The use of chemotherapy has produced objective responses and small

  2. Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Small Cell Lung Cancer

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about small cell lung cancer, see the following:Lung Cancer Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Lung CancerLung Cancer PreventionLung Cancer ScreeningDrugs Approved for Small Cell Lung CancerSmoking Home Page (Includes help with quitting)Cigarette Smoking: Health Risks and How to QuitSmoking in Cancer CareSecondhand Smoke and CancerFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  3. Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment

    Standard Treatment Options for Patients With Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC)Standard treatment options for patients with limited-stage SCLC include the following:Chemotherapy and radiation therapy.Combination chemotherapy alone.Surgery followed by chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy.Prophylactic cranial irradiation.Chemotherapy and radiation therapyCombined-modality treatment with etoposide and cisplatin with thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) is the most widely used treatment for patients with limited-stage disease (LD) SCLC.Evidence (combined modality treatment):Survival. The following results have been reported in clinical trials:Mature results of prospective randomized trials suggest that combined-modality therapy produces a modest but significant improvement in survival of 5% at 3 years compared with chemotherapy alone.[1,2,3][Level of evidence: 1iiA]Clinical trials have consistently achieved median survivals of 18 to 24 months and 40% to 50% 2-year survival

  4. Malignant Mesothelioma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Localized Malignant Mesothelioma (Stage I)

    Standard treatment options:[1] Solitary mesotheliomas: Surgical resection en bloc including contiguous structures to ensure wide disease-free margins. Sessile polypoid lesions should be treated with surgical resection to ensure maximal potential for cure.[2] Intracavitary mesothelioma:Palliative surgery (i.e., pleurectomy and decortication) with or without postoperative radiation therapy.Extrapleural pneumonectomy.Palliative radiation therapy.Treatment options under clinical evaluation: Intracavitary chemotherapy following resection.[3,4]Multimodality therapy.[4,5,6]Other clinical trials.Current Clinical TrialsCheck for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with localized malignant mesothelioma. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.References: Antman KH, Li FP, Osteen R, et al.:

  5. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Lung Cancer Screening

    Tests are used to screen for different types of cancer.Some screening tests are used because they have been shown to be helpful both in finding cancers early and decreasing the chance of dying from these cancers. Other tests are used because they have been shown to find cancer in some people; however, it has not been proven in clinical trials that use of these tests will decrease the risk of dying from cancer. Scientists study screening tests to find those with the fewest risks and most benefits. Cancer screening trials also are meant to show whether early detection (finding cancer before it causes symptoms) decreases a person's chance of dying from the disease. For some types of cancer, finding and treating the disease at an early stage may result in a better chance of recovery. Clinical trials that study cancer screening methods are taking place in many parts of the country. Information about ongoing clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site. Three screening tests have been

  6. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about non-small cell lung cancer, see the following: Lung Cancer Home PageWhat You Need To Know About™ Lung CancerLung Cancer PreventionLung Cancer ScreeningDrugs Approved for Non-Small Cell Lung CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies)Targeted Cancer TherapiesLasers in Cancer TreatmentPhotodynamic Therapy for CancerSmoking Home Page (Includes help with quitting)Secondhand Smoke and CancerFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  7. Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

  8. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    Screening tests have risks.Decisions about screening tests can be difficult. Not all screening tests are helpful and most have risks. Before having any screening test, you may want to discuss the test with your doctor. It is important to know the risks of the test and whether it has been proven to reduce the risk of dying from cancer.The risks of lung cancer screening tests include the following: Finding lung cancer may not improve health or help you live longer.Screening may not improve your health or help you live longer if you have lung cancer that has already spread to other places in your body. Some cancers never cause symptoms or become life-threatening, but if found by a screening test, the cancer may be treated. It is not known if treatment of these cancers would help you live longer than if no treatment were given, and treatments for cancer may have serious side effects. Harms of treatment may happen more often in people who have medical problems caused by heavy or long-term

  9. Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 02 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Description of the EvidenceAdded Spira et al. as reference 4.Added Lissowska et al. as reference 23.Added Straif et al. as reference 27.Added Gray et al. as reference 32.Added text evidence indicating an association between constituents of ambient air pollution and increased lung cancer mortality continues to strengthen, with reports from Asia and New Zealand documenting increased risks with exposure to measures of particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide (cited Katanoda et al., Cao et al., and Hales et al. as references 37, 38, and 39, respectively).Added World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research as reference 40.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary

  10. Malignant Mesothelioma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage Information for Malignant Mesothelioma

    Patients with stage I disease have a significantly better prognosis than those with more advanced stages. Because of the relative rarity of this disease, exact survival information based upon stage is limited.[1]Definitions of TNMThe American Joint Committee on Cancer has designated staging by TNM classification to define malignant mesothelioma.[2]International Mesothelioma Interest Group Staging System for Diffuse Malignant Pleural MesotheliomaTable 1. Primary Tumor (T)aa Reprinted with permission from AJCC: Pleural mesothelioma. In: Edge SB, Byrd DR, Compton CC, et al., eds.: AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer, 2010, pp 271-7.TXPrimary tumor cannot be assessed.T0No evidence of primary tumor.T1Tumor limited to the ipsilateral parietal pleura with or without mediastinal pleura and with or without diaphragmatic pleural involvement.T1aNo involvement of the visceral pleura.T1bTumor also involving the visceral pleura.T2Tumor involving each of the ipsilateral

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