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Lung Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Lung Cancer

  1. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    After lung cancer has been diagnosed,tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the lungs or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the lungs or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan ...

  2. Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Recurrent small cell lung cancer is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The cancer may come back in the chest,central nervous system,or in other parts of the body. ...

  3. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - What is screening?

    Screening is looking for cancer before a person has any symptoms. This can help find cancer at an early stage. When abnormal tissue or cancer is found early,it may be easier to treat. By the time symptoms appear,cancer may have begun to spread. Scientists are trying to better understand which people are more likely to get certain types of cancer. They also study the things we do and the ...

  4. Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Treatment of recurrent small cell lung cancer may include the following: Radiation therapy as palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life. Chemotherapy as palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life. Laser therapy,surgical placement of devices to keep the airways open,and/or internal radiation therapy,as palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and ...

  5. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Description of the Evidence

    BackgroundIncidence and mortalityLung cancer is the most commonly occurring noncutaneous cancer in men and women combined in the United States and is the leading cause of cancer deaths. In 2013 alone, it is estimated that there will be 228,190 new cases diagnosed, and 72,220 women and 87,260 men will die from this disease. The lung cancer death rate rose rapidly over several decades in both sexes, with a persistent decline for men commencing in 1991. From 2005 to 2009, death rates decreased by 2.8% per year in men and by 1.0% per year in women.[1]Risk factorsTobacco use, second hand smoke, and other risk factorsThe most important risk factor for lung cancer (as for many other cancers) is tobacco use.[2,3] Cigarette smoking has been definitively established by epidemiologic and preclinical animal experimental data as the primary cause of lung cancer. This causative link has been widely recognized since the 1960s, when national reports in Great Britain and the United

  6. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000258019-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Lung Cancer Screening

  7. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Get more information on non-small cell lung cancer treatment. How to contact the National Cancer Institute (NCI) via phone (1-800-4-Cancer), online, or mail. Plus, details on how to search the NCI web site, and how to order NCI publications.

  8. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062956-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment

  9. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Overview

    Separate PDQ summaries on Lung Cancer Prevention, Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment, and Levels of Evidence for Cancer Screening and Prevention Studies are also available.Evidence of Benefit Associated With ScreeningScreening by low-dose helical computed tomographyBenefitsThere is evidence that screening persons aged 55 to 74 years who have cigarette smoking histories of 30 or more pack-years and who, if they are former smokers, have quit within the last 15 years reduces lung cancer mortality by 20% and all-cause mortality by 6.7%.Magnitude of Effect: 20% relative reduction in lung cancer–specific mortality. Study Design: Evidence obtained from a randomized controlled trial.Internal Validity: Good.Consistency: Not applicable—one randomized trial to date.External Validity: Fair.HarmsBased on solid evidence, screening would lead to false-positive tests in approximately one-quarter of those screened. Most abnormalities would be monitored

  10. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (03 / 01 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Description of the EvidenceUpdated statistics with estimated new cases and deaths for 2013 (cited American Cancer Society as reference 1).This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

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