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Lung Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Lung Cancer

  1. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    Screening tests have risks.Decisions about screening tests can be difficult. Not all screening tests are helpful and most have risks. Before having any screening test, you may want to discuss the test with your doctor. It is important to know the risks of the test and whether it has been proven to reduce the risk of dying from cancer.The risks of lung cancer screening tests include the following: Finding lung cancer may not improve health or help you live longer.Screening may not improve your health or help you live longer if you have lung cancer that has already spread to other places in your body. Some cancers never cause symptoms or become life-threatening, but if found by a screening test, the cancer may be treated. It is not known if treatment of these cancers would help you live longer than if no treatment were given, and treatments for cancer may have serious side effects. Harms of treatment may happen more often in people who have medical problems caused by heavy or long-term

  2. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Questions or Comments About This Summary

    If you have questions or comments about this summary, please send them to Cancer.gov through the Web site's Contact Form. We can respond only to email messages written in English.

  3. Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Lung Cancer

    Lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung.The lungs are a pair of cone-shaped breathing organs in the chest. The lungs bring oxygen into the body as you breathe in. They release carbon dioxide, a waste product of the body's cells, as you breathe out. Each lung has sections called lobes. The left lung has two lobes. The right lung is slightly larger, and has three lobes. A thin membrane called the pleura surrounds the lungs. Two tubes called bronchi lead from the trachea (windpipe) to the right and left lungs. The bronchi are sometimes also involved in lung cancer. Tiny air sacs called alveoli and small tubes called bronchioles make up the inside of the lungs. Anatomy of the respiratory system, showing the trachea and both lungs and their lobes and airways. Lymph nodes and the diaphragm are also shown. Oxygen is inhaled into the lungs and passes through the thin membranes of the alveoli and into the bloodstream (see inset).There are two

  4. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 08 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Editorial changes were made to this summary.

  5. Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Small cell lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The lungs are a pair of cone-shaped breathing organs that are found within the chest. The lungs bring oxygen into the body when breathing in and take out carbon dioxide when breathing out. Each lung has sections called lobes. The left lung has two lobes. The right lung,which is slightly ...

  6. Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Questions or Comments About This Summary

    If you have questions or comments about this summary, please send them to Cancer.gov through the Web site's Contact Form. We can respond only to email messages written in English.

  7. Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Before initiating treatment of a patient with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), an experienced lung cancer pathologist should review the pathologic material.Pathologic ClassificationThe current classification of subtypes of SCLC includes the following:[1]Small cell carcinoma.Combined small cell carcinoma (i.e., SCLC combined with neoplastic squamous and/or glandular components).SCLC arising from neuroendocrine cells forms one extreme of the spectrum of neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung.Neuroendocrine tumors include the following:Low-grade typical carcinoid.Intermediate-grade atypical carcinoid.High-grade neuroendocrine tumors including large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) and SCLC.Because of differences in clinical behavior, therapy, and epidemiology, these tumors are classified separately in the World Health Organization (WHO) revised classification. The variant form of SCLC called mixed small cell/large cell carcinoma was not retained in the revised WHO classification.

  8. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of NSCLC

    Malignant non-small cell epithelial tumors of the lung are classified by the World Health Organization (WHO)/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). There are three main subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including the following: Squamous cell carcinoma (25% of lung cancers).Adenocarcinoma (40% of lung cancers).Large cell carcinoma (10% of lung cancers). There are numerous additional subtypes of decreasing frequency.[1]WHO/IASLC Histologic Classification of NSCLCSquamous cell carcinoma.Papillary.Clear cell.Small cell.Basaloid.Adenocarcinoma.Acinar.Papillary.Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. Nonmucinous.Mucinous.Mixed mucinous and nonmucinous or indeterminate cell type.Solid adenocarcinoma with mucin.Adenocarcinoma with mixed subtypes.Variants.Well-differentiated fetal adenocarcinoma.Mucinous (colloid) adenocarcinoma.Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma.Signet ring adenocarcinoma.Clear cell adenocarcinoma.Large cell carcinoma.Variants.Large cell

  9. Malignant Mesothelioma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma (Stages II, III, and IV)

    Standard treatment options:Symptomatic treatment to include drainage of effusions, chest tube pleurodesis, or thoracoscopic pleurodesis.[1] (Refer to the PDQ summary on Cardiopulmonary Syndromes for more information.)Palliative surgical resection in selected patients.[2,3]Palliative radiation therapy.[4,5]Single-agent chemotherapy. Partial responses have been reported with doxorubicin, epirubicin, mitomycin, cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and ifosfamide.[6,7,8]Combination chemotherapy (under clinical evaluation).[6,7,9] Information about ongoing clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site. Multimodality clinical trials.[10,11,12,13]Intracavitary therapy. Intrapleural or intraperitoneal administration of chemotherapeutic agents (e.g., cisplatin, mitomycin, and cytarabine) has been reported to produce transient reduction in the size of tumor masses and temporary control of effusions in small clinical studies.[14,15,16] Additional studies are needed to define

  10. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Treatment of recurrent non-small cell lung cancer may include the following:External radiation therapy as palliative therapy, to relieve pain and other symptoms and improve the quality of life.Chemotherapy.Targeted therapy with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor.Laser therapy or internal radiation therapy using an endoscope.Radiosurgery (for certain patients who cannot have surgery).Surgery to remove a very small amount of cancer that has spread to the brain.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent non-small cell lung cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

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