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    U.S. Lung Cancer Rates Continue to Drop: CDC

    Cigarette tax hikes, no-smoking policies contribute to decline, experts say

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Steven Reinberg

    HealthDay Reporter

    THURSDAY, Jan. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- As fewer Americans smoke, the number of people who develop lung cancer continues to drop, U.S. health officials report.

    Between 2005 and 2009, lung cancer rates went down 2.6 percent each year among men, from 87 to 78 cases per 100,000, and decreased 1.1 percent each year among women, from 57 to 54 cases per 100,000, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    "This is encouraging because lung cancer rates were going up among women, but they are starting to come down now," said report author S. Jane Henley, a CDC epidemiologist.

    These declining rates are largely the result of fewer people smoking cigarettes, she noted.

    "Smoking prevalence has been decreasing for several years, and that's finally paying off. This is largely due to increased tobacco control, including increases in tobacco prices and more smoke-free laws, which protect both smokers and nonsmokers," Henley said.

    Despite all efforts, however, almost 20 percent of American adults still smoke, Henley said, but "we are seeing some declines among youth that drop smoking below 10 percent, which is very encouraging."

    To get at that reluctant 20 percent, Henley thinks more needs to be done to make smoking unattractive. "Increasing tobacco prices will make a big difference. It seems to make the biggest difference for young adults," she said.

    In addition, more smoke-free laws and stronger enforcement of them would also make a difference in getting more people to quit, Henley said.

    The message from Henley is clear: If you smoke, stop. If you don't, don't start. "Quitting is very hard, but there are a lot of resources to help you quit," she said.

    The report was published Jan. 10 in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

    "The good news is that for most age groups, lung cancer rates are declining, particularly and most rapidly among men," said Rebecca Siegel, director of surveillance information at the American Cancer Society.

    "This is a true testament to the success of the tobacco control movement. The lag in decline for women reflects their later uptake of smoking," she noted.

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