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    Congenital Pulmonary Lymphangiectasia

    Important
    It is possible that the main title of the report Congenital Pulmonary Lymphangiectasia is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

    Synonyms

    • CPL
    • PPL
    • primary pulmonary lymphangiectasia
    • pulmonary cystic lymphangiectasis

    Disorder Subdivisions

    • None

    General Discussion

    Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia (CPL) is a rare developmental disorder that is present at birth (congenital). Affected infants have abnormally widened (dilated) lymphatic vessels within the lungs. The lymphatic system helps the immune system in protecting the body against infection and disease. It consists of a network of tubular channels (lymph vessels) that drain a thin watery fluid known as lymph from different areas of the body into the bloodstream. Lymph accumulates in the tiny spaces between tissue cells and contains proteins, fats, and certain white blood cells known as lymphocytes.

    Infants with CPL often develop severe, potentially life-threatening, respiratory distress shortly after birth. Affected infants may also develop cyanosis, a condition marked by abnormal bluish discoloration of the skin that occurs because of low levels of circulating oxygen in the blood. The exact cause of CPL is unknown.

    CPL can occur as a primary or secondary disorder. Primary pulmonary lymphangiectasia can occur as isolated congenital defect within the lungs or as part of a generalized form of lymphatic vessel malformation (lymphangiectasia) that affects the entire body, usually associated with generalized lymphedema. Secondary CPL occurs secondary to a variety of heart (cardiac) abnormalities, and/or lymphatic obstructive forms.

    Resources

    National Lymphedema Network
    116 New Montgomery Street
    Suite 235
    San Francisco, CA 94105
    Tel: (415)908-3681
    Fax: (415)908-3813
    Tel: (800)541-3259
    Email: nln@lymphnet.org
    Internet: http://www.lymphnet.org

    March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation
    1275 Mamaroneck Avenue
    White Plains, NY 10605
    Tel: (914)997-4488
    Fax: (914)997-4763
    Tel: (888)663-4637
    Email: Askus@marchofdimes.com
    Internet: http://www.marchofdimes.com

    NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
    P.O. Box 30105
    Bethesda, MD 20892-0105
    Tel: (301)592-8573
    Fax: (301)251-1223
    Email: nhlbiinfo@rover.nhlbi.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/

    Lymphatic Research Foundation
    40 Garvies Point Road
    Glen Cove, NY 11542
    USA
    Tel: (516)625-9675
    Fax: (516)625-9410
    Email: lrf@lymphaticresearch.org
    Internet: http://www.lymphaticresearch.org

    Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
    PO Box 8126
    Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
    Tel: (301)251-4925
    Fax: (301)251-4911
    Tel: (888)205-2311
    TDD: (888)205-3223
    Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

    British Paediatric Orphan Lung Disease
    Email: admin@bpold.co.uk
    Internet: http://www.bpold.co.uk

    For a Complete Report:

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

    The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

    It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

    This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

    For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

    Last Updated: 4/4/2012
    Copyright 2008, 2012 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

    WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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