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    COPD Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to COPD

    1. COPD: Handling a Flare-Up - Surgery

      Lung surgery is rarely used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Surgery is never the first treatment option and is only considered for people who have severe COPD that has not improved with other treatment.Surgery ChoicesLung volume reduction surgery removes a portion of one or both lungs, making room for the remaining lung tissue to work more efficiently. It is used only in ...

    2. COPD: Handling a Flare-Up - Topic Overview

      Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) weakens the structure of the lung and may also damage the tiny air sacs (alveoli) in the lung. When these air sacs break down,larger airspaces known as bullae are formed. Bullae sometimes can become so large that they interfere with breathing and may cause complications: They can burst,leading to a collapsed lung ( pneumothorax ). A collapsed lung ...

    3. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Genetic Testing - Prevention

      The best way to prevent the development and worsening of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is to not smoke. Other airway irritants (such as air pollution, chemical fumes, and dust) also can make COPD worse, but they are far less important than smoking in causing the disease. Stopping smoking is especially important if you have low levels of the protein alpha1 - antitrypsin. People who .

    4. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) - Cause

      Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is most often caused by smoking. Nearly everyone with COPD (80% to 90%) has been a long - term smoker, and research supports the fact that smoking cigarettes increases the risk of developing COPD.1 At least 10% to 15% of long - term smokers develop COPD with symptoms; some studies indicate up to 50% of long - term smokers older than age 45 develop COPD.

    5. COPD: Avoiding Your Triggers

      You can do things at home to manage COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). By learning the triggers for COPD and avoiding them, you can help reduce flare-ups.

    6. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) - What Increases Your Risk

      Risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) include those you can control, such as smoking, and others that you cannot control, such as inherited factors (genes).Risk factors you can controlTobacco smoking is the most important risk factor for COPD. In comparison, other risk factors are minor.At least 10% to 15% of all cigarette smokers develop COPD with symptoms; some studies ..

    7. COPD: Handling a Flare-Up - Topic Overview

      Lung function means how well your lungs work. When you have COPD,your lungs can't move as much air in and out as they should. And the more serious your COPD is,the less air your lungs are able to move. Spirometry tests are used to measure lung function. They measure how much air you breathe out when you take long,deep breaths and push the air out of your lungs. For people with COPD,the ...

    8. COPD: Handling a Flare-Up - Frequently Asked Questions

      Learning about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD):What is COPD?What causes COPD?Can I prevent COPD?What are the symptoms of COPD?What happens in COPD?What increases my risk for COPD?What is a COPD exacerbation?Who is affected with COPD?Being diagnosed:Who can diagnose COPD?How is COPD diagnosed?Getting treatment: How is COPD treated?What medications will I need to take?Will I need ...

    9. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) - When to Call a Doctor

      Call your health professional immediately if you have been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and you:Have shortness of breath or wheezing that is rapidly getting worse.Are coughing more deeply or more frequently, especially if you notice an increase in mucus (sputum) or a change in the color of the mucus you cough up.Cough up blood.Have increased swelling in your legs or

    10. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) - Topic Overview

      What does it mean to conserve energy?Cooking dinner, putting away laundry, or even just walking across your living room can be exhausting when you have COPD, heart failure, or another long-term (chronic) condition. You may feel at times as though you've lost your ability to live your life.Conserving, or saving, your energy means finding ways of doing daily activities with as little effort as possible. With some planning and tips, you can get tasks done more easily and enjoy your daily routine.How can you conserve energy in daily activities?Plan activitiesMake a list of what you have to do every day. Group the tasks by location, so you do all the chores you have in one part of your house around the same time.Go out for errands or do chores at the time of day when you have the most energy.Leave plenty of time to do tasks or get to events. That way you aren't rushed and breathless to get somewhere. Include rest periods in your day.Ask for help from family or friends for chores that are

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