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Interventional Pulmonology

Interventional Pulmonology Procedures continued...

Pleuroscopy. A doctor cuts small incisions in the chest wall and advances a pleuroscope (a type of endoscope) into the chest cavity. The pleuroscope is advanced around the chest wall and lung on one side. Pleuroscopy can diagnose some conditions of the pleura (lining of the lung). Pleuroscopy also allows a view of the outside edges of the lung, which bronchoscopy cannot provide.

Thoracentesis. To drain fluid from around the lungs (pleural effusion), a doctor inserts a needle into the chest wall. A plastic catheter is advanced over the needle, which is then removed. The excess pleural fluid is suctioned out of the chest and the catheter is removed and discarded.

Pleurodesis. Pleurodesis is an interventional pulmonology procedure performed for people with recurring pleural effusions (fluid around the lungs). In pleurodesis, a doctor makes an incision in the chest wall. A plastic tube is inserted into the chest cavity, and an irritating chemical is sprayed around the lung. Over time, the inflamed lung lining (pleura) adheres tightly to the chest wall. This prevents fluid from reaccumulating around the lung.

Indwelling pleural catheter. A pleural catheter is an alternative to pleurodesis for treatment of a recurrent pleural effusion. Through minor surgery, a plastic catheter is tunneled beneath the skin, with its tip placed inside the chest cavity. As pleural fluid accumulates around the lung, a person can drain the indwelling pleural catheter at home, using special sterile supplies.

Bronchoscopic thermoplasty. Thermoplasty is an interventional pulmonology procedure for certain people with severe asthma that can’t be controlled with medications. During bronchoscopy, a doctor applies a heat probe to the walls of the airways. The heat destroys the smooth muscle layers whose constriction contributes to asthma symptoms.

 

Interventional Pulmonary Diagnostics

Interventional pulmonology procedures offer the potential advantage of avoiding more invasive surgery. For example, before interventional pulmonology, biopsy of lymph nodes in the chest required chest wall surgery.

Two recent advances in technology are extending the reach of interventional pulmonology procedures:

  • Endobronchial ultrasound system (EBUS): An ultrasound probe on the tip of a bronchoscope allows a doctor to biopsy lymph nodes with more precision. In experienced hands, EBUS increases the likelihood of a correct diagnosis significantly.
  • Electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (superDimension): An advanced system that guides the bronchoscope farther than traditional bronchoscopy allows. This system permits biopsy of hard-to-reach abnormal areas of the lung, which would otherwise require more invasive testing.

 

Interventional Pulmonology Risks and Limitations

Although interventional pulmonology procedures carry low risks, they are not risk-free. Uncommon complications of interventional pulmonology procedures include:

  • Pneumothorax (collapsed lung)
  • Bleeding
  • Oversedation, leading to pneumonia or the need for temporary life support

Interventional pulmonology procedures are generally safer and have a shorter recovery time, compared to surgery. However, surgery remains the best option for diagnosis and treatment of many lung conditions.

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WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by James E. Gerace, MD on July 02, 2013

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