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    Lung Disease & Respiratory Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Lung

    1. Respiratory Problems, Age 12 and Older - Care for your child

      How do you treat your child's respiratory infection at home?Give your child acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) for fever or pain. Be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label. Do not give aspirin to anyone younger than 20. It has been linked to Reye syndrome, a serious illness.Be careful with cough and cold medicines. They may not be safe for young children, so check the label first. If you do give these medicines to a child, always follow the directions about how much to give based on the child's age and weight.Be careful when giving your child over-the-counter cold or flu medicines and Tylenol at the same time. Many of these medicines have acetaminophen, which is Tylenol. Read the labels to make sure that you are not giving your child more than the recommended dose. Too much acetaminophen (Tylenol) can be harmful.Keep your child away from smoke. Do not smoke or allow anyone else to smoke in your house.Make sure your child rests. Keep your

    2. Breathing Problems: Causes, Tests, and Treatments

      WebMD discusses some common causes of breathing problems, including allergies and asthma. Learn more about breathing problems and how they're diagnosed and treated.

    3. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - Prevention

      Information on how to avoid catching respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection.

    4. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - Cause

      Pulmonary embolism is caused by a blocked artery in the lungs. The most common cause of such a blockage is a blood clot that forms in a deep vein in the leg and travels to the lungs, where it becomes lodged in a smaller lung artery.

    5. How Cystic Fibrosis Affects the Bones - Topic Overview

      Regular exercise improves the health of people who have cystic fibrosis. Exercise helps loosen mucus, encourages coughing, improves oxygen flow, and makes you feel better. Upper body exercises, such as swimming or rowing, increase the strength and endurance of the muscles that are used for breathing. After talking to your doctor about how much exercise is good for your child, encourage your child to participate in sports and recreational activities. Team sports are great ways for your child to stay fit and to interact with other children. Talk to the coach or supervisor about your child's abilities and the important role of physical activity in the treatment of cystic fibrosis.Some people who have cystic fibrosis may not be strong enough to participate in certain activities. Your doctor can recommend the right amount and type of exercise for you. Or you may work with a physical therapist to develop your own exercise routine. For more information, see the topic Fitness: Getting and

    6. COPD: Clearing Your Lungs

      COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is a long-term illness that makes it hard to breathe, but learning to clear your lungs may help you save energy and oxygen, and help prevent lung infections.

    7. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - Treatment Overview

      Treatment of pulmonary embolism focuses on preventing future pulmonary embolism by using anticlotting drugs.

    8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Genetic Testing - Prevention

      The best way to prevent the development and worsening of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is to not smoke. Other airway irritants (such as air pollution, chemical fumes, and dust) also can make COPD worse, but they are far less important than smoking in causing the disease. Stopping smoking is especially important if you have low levels of the protein alpha1 - antitrypsin. People who .

    9. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - Home Treatment

      Most mild to moderate respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in otherwise healthy people are like the common cold and can be treated at home.

    10. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) - Exams and Tests

      Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can usually be diagnosed using a medical history and lung function tests, such as spirometry. Your doctor will also conduct a physical examination and may suggest a chest X - ray to rule out other conditions with similar symptoms, such as asthma. Some tests are done to rule out other diseases or conditions that may make COPD worse and its treatment more

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