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Lung Disease & Respiratory Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Lung

  1. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) - Cause

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is most often caused by smoking. Nearly everyone with COPD (80% to 90%) has been a long - term smoker, and research supports the fact that smoking cigarettes increases the risk of developing COPD.1 At least 10% to 15% of long - term smokers develop COPD with symptoms; some studies indicate up to 50% of long - term smokers older than age 45 develop COPD.

  2. COPD Flare-Ups - Topic Overview

    When you have COPD, especially if you have chronic bronchitis, you may sometimes have sudden attacks where your breathing and coughing symptoms suddenly get worse and stay that way. These attacks are called COPD exacerbations, or flare-ups. With treatment, many people recover and return to the same level of shortness of breath they had before the attack. These attacks are often life-threatening. If your symptoms suddenly get worse, and if taking your medicine doesn't help, have someone take you to the emergency room. Call if needed.COPD attacks often occur more frequently, last longer, and are more severe the longer you have COPD.CauseThe two most common causes of a COPD attack are:1A lung infection, such as acute bronchitis or pneumonia. Infections are the most common cause of COPD attacks. Infections usually are caused by viruses but can also be caused by bacteria.Air pollution.Other causes may include heart failure, allergic reactions, inhaling food or stomach contents into the

  3. Beta2-Agonists for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    Drug details for Beta2-agonists for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  4. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) - Prevention

    The best way to prevent the development and worsening of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is to not smoke. Other airway irritants (such as air pollution, chemical fumes, and dust) also can make COPD worse, but they are far less important than smoking in causing the disease. Stopping smoking is especially important if you have low levels of the protein alpha1 - antitrypsin. People who .

  5. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) - Exams and Tests

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can usually be diagnosed using a medical history and lung function tests, such as spirometry. Your doctor will also conduct a physical examination and may suggest a chest X - ray to rule out other conditions with similar symptoms, such as asthma. Some tests are done to rule out other diseases or conditions that may make COPD worse and its treatment more

  6. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) - Other Treatment

    Other treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) includes:Pulmonary rehabilitation, which employs a team of health professionals that monitors and treats the medical, physical, and emotional aspects of COPD. It generally combines exercise, breathing therapy, emotional support, nutritional guidance, and education. Pulmonary rehabilitation is required for those undergoing lung ...

  7. Corticosteroids for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    Drug details for Corticosteroids for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  8. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) - Ongoing Concerns

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) gradually worsens over time. Your symptoms depend on when COPD was diagnosed, how far along it is, and your lifestyle.If you are diagnosed early, before a lot of lung damage has taken place, you may have very mild symptoms, even when you are active. If you are diagnosed later, you may have already lost much of your lung function. If you have an ...

  9. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Genetic Testing - What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Alpha1 - antitrypsin (AAT) is a protein normally found in the lungs and the bloodstream. It helps protect the lungs from diseases such as emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). People who do not make enough of this protein-this is called AAT deficiency-are more likely to have these lung diseases and will get them at a younger - than - normal age (30 to 40 years old). AAT defic

  10. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Genetic Testing - Why Would I Not Be Tested?

    You may decide not to be tested because:You do not have symptoms of lung disease.No one in your family has AAT deficiency or lung or liver disease.You would be worried if you knew that you might get lung or liver disease some day.You do not smoke and you already are taking good care of yourself. You think there is nothing more you could do to prevent or delay the disease.The test cannot predict ..

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