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    Lung Disease & Respiratory Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Lung

    1. COPD: Avoiding Your Triggers

      You can do things at home to manage COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). By learning the triggers for COPD and avoiding them, you can help reduce flare-ups.

    2. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - Topic Overview

      Normally,blood flows from the right side of the heart through the pulmonary arteries and lungs before it returns to the left side of the heart. A paradoxical embolism is a blood clot that does not travel with normal blood flow. This type of embolism often causes a stroke because the clot moves directly from the right side of the heart to the left through a hole (defect) in the septum,which ...

    3. Antibiotics for Pneumonia

      Drug details for Antibiotics for Pneumonia.

    4. Sarah's Story: Dealing With the Emotions From COPD - Topic Overview

      People with cystic fibrosis can get lung infections and other respiratory problems because of the buildup of thick, sticky mucus that traps bacteria. Talk to your doctor or respiratory therapist about airway-clearance methods and medicines that you can use to help get rid of mucus. Your doctor or respiratory therapist may suggest some things that you or your child can do at home to help clear mucus from the lungs. These include:Postural drainage and chest percussion, to help with coughing up mucus from the lungs. For specific instructions, see: Cystic Fibrosis: Helping Your Child Cough Up Mucus.Deep breathing exercises, to help with breathing out completely and to strengthen the muscles used for breathing. Directed cough, to help clear mucus by breathing and coughing in specific ways. Exercise. Aerobic exercise can improve how well the lungs work. Ask your doctor about what kinds of exercise you or your child should do.Other methods use mechanical equipment to help clear mucus from

    5. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - Cal's story

      Why me? That’s what Cal asked himself over and over after he was diagnosed with severe COPD 5 years ago. "I spent the first 2 years moping around the house,feeling sorry for myself," he says. "I didn't go anywhere,I didn't do anything. I just sat in front of the TV and tried not to think about anything." Then one day Sonny,his 5-year-old granddaughter,walked up to him as he sat in his ...

    6. Sarah's Story: Dealing With the Emotions From COPD - Topic Overview

      Regular exercise improves the health of people who have cystic fibrosis. Exercise helps loosen mucus, encourages coughing, improves oxygen flow, and makes you feel better. Upper body exercises, such as swimming or rowing, increase the strength and endurance of the muscles that are used for breathing. After talking to your doctor about how much exercise is good for your child, encourage your child to participate in sports and recreational activities. Team sports are great ways for your child to stay fit and to interact with other children. Talk to the coach or supervisor about your child's abilities and the important role of physical activity in the treatment of cystic fibrosis.Some people who have cystic fibrosis may not be strong enough to participate in certain activities. Your doctor can recommend the right amount and type of exercise for you. Or you may work with a physical therapist to develop your own exercise routine. For more information, see the topic Fitness: Getting and

    7. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - Topic Overview

      Normal lung and respiratory functionThe breathing tubes, or bronchi, leading to the air sacs (alveoli) are lined with cells that produce mucus. Normally, the cells produce a thin, runny mucus that coats the surface of the lungs.Foreign particles, such as dust and germs, constantly enter the lungs and become trapped in the mucus. Tiny hairs called cilia on the surface of the breathing tubes sweep the mucus and foreign particles upward into the larger air passages and then up to the throat where they can be swallowed or coughed up.Effects of cystic fibrosis on lung and respiratory functionCystic fibrosis causes the mucus that coats the breathing tubes to become so thick and sticky that the cilia are unable to sweep the germs and other particles up and out of the lungs. The trapped bacteria lead to frequent, serious infections and permanent lung damage.In response to infections, the body's immune system sends white blood cells to the lungs to attempt to destroy the infection. White blood

    8. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - Symptoms

      When a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection affects the nose and throat (upper respiratory system), symptoms are usually mild and resemble those of the common cold.

    9. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - What Happens

      After you've been infected with a pneumonia-causing organism, it takes as little as 1 to 3 days or as long as 7 to 10 days for symptoms to appear.

    10. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - Fran's story

      I was so scared when the doctor told me I had emphysema. I was afraid to go anywhere or do anything. I plunged into a big black hole of depression. Someone told me to go online and hook up with a support group. I did,and it literally changed my life. I was pretty shy at first,and all I did was read what everyone else was writing. Then one day I was having trouble with the company that ...

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