Skip to content

Lupus Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Fever and Lupus

Fever is often a part of lupus. For some people with lupus, an intermittent (coming and going) or continuous low-grade fever may be normal. Other people, especially those on large doses of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or corticosteroids, may not have fever at all because these drugs may mask a fever.

If you have lupus, you may be more vulnerable to certain infections than are other people without lupus. In addition, you may be more prone to infection if you are taking any immunosuppressive drugs for your lupus. Be alert to a temperature that is new or higher than normal for you, because it could be a sign of a developing infection or a lupus flare.

Recommended Related to Lupus

Lupus, Skin Care, and Makeup

Amanda Greene, 43, stashes a tube of sunscreen in her purse and car so that she can reapply it throughout the day -- as frequently as some women touch up their makeup. Using sun protection is second nature for Greene, who was diagnosed with lupus (SLE) at 15 and is photosensitive. "I use it from head to toe 365 days a year, whether it's gray or sunny," says Greene, a Los Angeles lupus advocate. "Some women reapply lipstick -- I reapply my SPF. It's part of living with lupus." Women who have lupus...

Read the Lupus, Skin Care, and Makeup article > >

Caring For Yourself

  • Take your temperature at least once a day (or more often if needed) to determine what a "normal" temperature is for you.
  • Take your temperature and watch for a fever any time you feel chills or do not feel well.
  • Call your doctor immediately if you have a new or higher-than-normal temperature.
  • Even if you don't have a fever, don't hesitate to call your doctor if you do not feel well in any way, particularly if you are taking aspirin, NSAIDs, or a corticosteroid. Signs of infection other than a fever include unusual pain, cramping or swelling, a headache with neck stiffness, cold or flu symptoms, trouble breathing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or changes in urine or stool.
  • Talk to your doctor about immunization against pneumococcal pneumonia and the flu.
  • Practice good personal hygiene.
  • Avoid large crowds and people who are sick.

WebMD Public Information from the U.S. National Institutes of Health

Today on WebMD

grocery shopping list
And the memory problems that may come with it.
Lupus rash on nails
A detailed, visual guide.
 
sunburst filtering through leaves
You might be extra sensitive to UV light. Read on.
fruit drinks
For better focus in your life.
 
Woman rubbing shoulder
Slideshow
Bag of cosmetics
Video
 
young woman hiding face
Quiz
pregnant woman
Article
 
5 Lupus Risk Factors
Article
Young adult couple
Article
 
doctor advising patient
Article
sticky notes on face
Video
 

WebMD Special Sections