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Lupus and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome - Topic Overview

About 1 out of 3 people with lupus produce an antibody that attacks certain blood-clotting factors, which can cause the blood to clot easily.1 A person who has this antibody and has had blood clots is said to have antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. This can lead to mild or severe blood-clotting complications, including:

A blood test can detect antiphospholipid antibodies. When diagnosed, the condition is usually treated with anticoagulants. Pregnant women with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome need to be closely monitored.

Recommended Related to Lupus

How Lupus Affects Your Skin

If you have lupus, you're likely to have skin issues at some point, but treatment can bring relief. Your doctor will likely prescribe an ointment, such as a steroid cream or gel, to clear up the problems. Sometimes steroid shots are used. You can also help prevent skin reactions, too. The best way is to use sunscreen to protect yourself from the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays.

Read the How Lupus Affects Your Skin article > >

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: September 09, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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