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Melanoma/Skin Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Melanoma Skin Cancer

  1. Recurrent Intraocular Melanoma

    The prognosis for any patient with recurring or relapsing disease is poor,regardless of cell type or stage. The question and selection of further treatment depends on many factors,including the extent of the lesion,age and health of the patient,prior treatment,and site of recurrence,as well as individual patient considerations. Clinical trials are appropriate and should be considered ...

  2. Cellular Classification of Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma

    Primary intraocular melanomas originate from melanocytes in the uveal tract.[1] Four distinct cellular types are recognized in intraocular melanoma (revised Callender classification):[2]Spindle-A cells (spindle-shaped cells with slender nuclei and lacking visible nucleoli). Spindle-B cells (spindle-shaped cells with larger nuclei and distinct nucleoli).Epithelioid cells (larger polygonal cells with one or more prominent nucleoli).Intermediate cells (similar to but smaller than epithelioid cells).Most primary intraocular melanomas contain variable proportions of epithelioid, spindle-A, and spindle-B cells (mixed-cell melanomas). Pure epithelioid-cell primary melanomas are infrequent (approximately 3% of cases).[1] In the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, mixed-cell type melanomas predominated (86% of cases).[3]References: Klintworth GK, Scroggs MW: The eye and ocular adnexa. In: Sternberg SS, ed.: Diagnostic Surgical Pathology. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1999,

  3. Get More Information From NCI

    Get more information on eye melanoma treatment. How to contact the National Cancer Institute (NCI) via phone (1-800-4-Cancer), online, or mail. Plus, details on how to search the NCI web site, and how to order NCI publications.

  4. Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer and actinic keratosis. Different types of treatment are available for patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer and actinic keratosis. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment),and some are being tested in clinical trials. Before starting treatment,patients may want to think about taking part in a ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview

    Role of ObservationIris melanomas have relatively good outcomes with a 5-year survival rate of more than 95%. They are predominantly of the spindle-cell type and are usually smaller in size than posterior melanomas because of earlier detection. Conservative management is generally advocated whenever possible, but surgical intervention may be justified with unequivocal tumor growth or with extensive disease at initial examination.The management of small choroidal melanomas is controversial, and it is not clear whether treatment of small tumors prevents metastasis.[1] The natural history of small choroidal melanoma is poorly understood. Small, pigmented, choroidal lesions cannot always be differentiated reliably on examination. Growth is a presumed indicator of malignant potential.[2] The likelihood of progression from the time of diagnosis to the time when tumor growth warrants treatment has not been well characterized. Some ophthalmologists advocate

  6. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Screening tests have risks. Decisions about screening tests can be difficult. Not all screening tests are helpful and most have risks. Before having any screening test,you may want to discuss the test with your doctor. It is important to know the risks of the test and whether it has been proven to reduce the risk of dying from cancer. The risks of melanoma screening tests include the ...

  7. About PDQ

    PDQ IS A COMPREHENSIVE CANCER DATABASE AVAILABLE ON NCI'S WEB SITE. PDQ is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. Most of the information contained in PDQ is available online at NCI's Web site. PDQ is provided as a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health,the federal government's focal point for biomedical research. .

  8. Description of the Evidence

    Background Incidence and mortality There are three main types of skin cancer: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (together with BCC referred to as nonmelanoma skin cancer [NMSC]). Melanoma. BCC and SCC are the most common forms of skin cancer but have substantially better prognoses than the less common,generally more aggressive,melanoma. NMSC is the most commonly ...

  9. Interventions With Inadequate Evidence as to Whether They Reduce Risk of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Sunscreen Use and Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Avoidance Benefits The evidence that interventions designed to reduce exposure to UV radiation by the use of sunscreen,protective clothing,or limitation of sun exposure time decrease the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer is inadequate. A randomized study suggested a possible reduction in incidence of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs),but study ...

  10. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Basal Cell Carcinoma Treatment of basal cell carcinoma may include the following: Mohs micrographic surgery. Simple excision. Electrodesiccation and curettage. Cryosurgery. Radiation therapy. Laser surgery. Topical chemotherapy with fluorouracil. Photodynamic therapy. A clinical trial of biologic therapy. Follow-up skin exams are important for people with basal cell carcinoma because ...

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