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    Melanoma/Skin Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Melanoma Skin Cancer

    1. Can You Reverse Sun Damage?

      Can sun damage to skin be reversed? Experts shed light on the subject.

    2. Understanding Skin Cancer -- the Basics

      From symptoms to prevention, get the basics on skin cancer from the experts at WebMD.

    3. 10 Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Melanoma

      If you've just been diagnosed with melanoma, you have questions. WebMD experts provide 10 questions you might want to ask your doctor.

    4. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Intraocular Melanoma

      The prognosis for any patient with recurring or relapsing disease is poor, regardless of cell type or stage. The question and selection of further treatment depends on many factors, including the extent of the lesion, age and health of the patient, prior treatment, and site of recurrence, as well as individual patient considerations. Surgical resection of metastases diagnosed subsequent to initial management of ocular melanoma in single-center, case series of highly selected patients has been reported. The extent to which the occasional favorable outcomes are the result of strong selection factors is not clear, so this approach cannot be considered standard.[1]Clinical trials are appropriate, and eligible patients should be advised to consider participation in them whenever possible. Current Clinical TrialsCheck for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent intraocular melanoma. The list of clinical trials can be

    5. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

      Recurrent metastatic squamous neck cancer with occult primary is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The cancer may come back in the neck or other parts of the body.

    6. Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma

      Primary intraocular melanomas originate from melanocytes in the uveal tract.[1] Four distinct cellular types are recognized in intraocular melanoma (revised Callender classification):[2]Spindle-A cells (spindle-shaped cells with slender nuclei and lacking visible nucleoli). Spindle-B cells (spindle-shaped cells with larger nuclei and distinct nucleoli).Epithelioid cells (larger polygonal cells with one or more prominent nucleoli).Intermediate cells (similar to but smaller than epithelioid cells).Most primary intraocular melanomas contain variable proportions of epithelioid, spindle-A, and spindle-B cells (mixed-cell melanomas). Pure epithelioid-cell primary melanomas are infrequent (approximately 3% of cases).[1] In the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, mixed-cell type melanomas predominated (86% of cases).[3]References: Klintworth GK, Scroggs MW: The eye and ocular adnexa. In: Sternberg SS, ed.: Diagnostic Surgical Pathology. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1999,

    7. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 25 / 2014)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Editorial changes were made to this summary.

    8. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

      Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

    9. Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (10 / 09 / 2014)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.IntroductionAdded Vandergriff et al. as reference 1, Soyer et al. as reference 3, Koster et al. as reference 4, Kamino et al. as reference 5, McCalmont as reference 6, and Kaddu et al. as reference 7.Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)Added text about the association of intense, intermittent recreational sun exposure with melanoma and BCC, and chronic occupational sun exposure with squamous cell carcinoma. Also added text about available data regarding regular sunscreen use and skin cancer risk reduction (cited Green et al. [J Epidemiol 1999] as reference 5, Pandeya et al. as reference 6, and Green et al. [Lancet 1999] as reference 7).Added text to state that tanning bed use has also been associated with an increased risk of BCC. Also added text about a study of 376 individuals with BCC and 390 control

    10. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stage 0 Melanoma Treatment

      Stage 0 melanoma is defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer's TNM classification system:[1]Tis, N0, M0Patients with stage 0 disease may be treated by excision with minimal, but microscopically free, margins. Current Clinical TrialsCheck for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage 0 melanoma. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.References: Melanoma of the skin. In: Edge SB, Byrd DR, Compton CC, et al., eds.: AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer, 2010, pp 325-44.

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