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Melanoma/Skin Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Melanoma Skin Cancer

  1. Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

  2. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (05 / 23 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.IntroductionAdded Vandergriff et al. as reference 1, Soyer et al. as reference 3, Koster et al. as reference 4, Kamino et al. as reference 5, McCalmont as reference 6, and Kaddu et al. as reference 7.Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)Added text about the association of intense, intermittent recreational sun exposure with melanoma and BCC, and chronic occupational sun exposure with squamous cell carcinoma. Also added text about available data regarding regular sunscreen use and skin cancer risk reduction (cited Green et al. [J Epidemiol 1999] as reference 5, Pandeya et al. as reference 6, and Green et al. [Lancet 1999] as reference 7).Added text to state that tanning bed use has also been associated with an increased risk of BCC. Also added text about a study of 376 individuals with BCC and 390 control

  3. Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Skin Cancer

    Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the skin.The skin is the body's largest organ. It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection. Skin also helps control body temperature and stores water, fat, and vitamin D. The skin has several layers, but the two main layers are the epidermis (top or outer layer) and the dermis (lower or inner layer). Skin cancer begins in the epidermis, which is made up of three kinds of cells:Squamous cells: Thin, flat cells that form the top layer of the epidermis. Cancer that forms in squamous cells is called squamous cell carcinoma.Basal cells: Round cells under the squamous cells. Cancer that forms in basal cells is called basal cell carcinoma.Melanocytes: Found in the lower part of the epidermis, these cells make melanin, the pigment that gives skin its natural color. When skin is exposed to the sun, melanocytes make more pigment and cause the skin to tan, or darken. Cancer that forms in melanocytes

  4. Skin Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Who is at Risk?

    Note: Separate PDQ summaries on Skin Cancer Screening,Skin Cancer Treatment,and Levels of Evidence for Cancer Screening and Prevention Studies are also available. Individuals whose skin freckles,tans poorly,or burns easily after sun exposure are particularly susceptible to developing skin cancer.[ 1 ] Observational and analytic epidemiologic studies have consistently shown that increased ...

  5. Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    Role of ObservationIris melanomas have relatively good outcomes with a 5-year survival rate of more than 95%. They are predominantly of the spindle-cell type and are usually smaller in size than posterior melanomas because of earlier detection. Conservative management is generally advocated whenever possible, but surgical intervention may be justified with unequivocal tumor growth or with extensive disease at initial examination.The management of small choroidal melanomas is controversial, and it is not clear whether treatment of small tumors prevents metastasis.[1] The natural history of small choroidal melanoma is poorly understood. Small, pigmented, choroidal lesions cannot always be differentiated reliably on examination. Growth is a presumed indicator of malignant potential.[2] The likelihood of progression from the time of diagnosis to the time when tumor growth warrants treatment has not been well characterized. Some ophthalmologists advocate

  6. Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stages of Skin Cancer

    After nonmelanoma skin cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the skin or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the skin or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of

  7. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

  8. Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 22 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Editorial changes were made to this summary.

  9. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Melanoma

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about melanoma, see the following:Melanoma Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Melanoma and Other Skin CancersSkin Cancer PreventionSkin Cancer ScreeningSentinel Lymph Node BiopsyDrugs Approved for MelanomaBiological Therapies for CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies)Targeted Cancer TherapiesFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  10. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage III Melanoma

    Stage III melanoma is defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer's TNM classification system:[1]Any T, N1, M0Any T, N2, M0Any T, N3, M0Standard Treatment Options for Patients With Stage III MelanomaWide local excision of the primary tumor with 1 cm to 3 cm margins, depending on tumor thickness and location.[2,3,4,5,6,7,8] Skin grafting may be necessary to close the resulting defect.High-dose or pegylated interferon alpha-2b as adjuvant treatment for patients who have undergone a complete surgical resection but are considered to be at high risk for relapse.Ipilimumab for patients with unresectable disease.Vemurafenib for patients with unresectable disease who test positive for the BRAF V600 mutation in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved test.Adjuvant Treatment Options for Patients With Resected Stage III DiseaseProspective, randomized, multicenter treatment trials have demonstrated that high-dose interferon alpha-2b and pegylated interferon do not improve overall

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