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Melanoma/Skin Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Melanoma Skin Cancer

  1. Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Medium and Large Choroidal Melanoma

    Eye-sparing radiation therapy, either by plaque brachytherapy or external beam, is the preferred option for most patients with medium-sized choroidal melanoma. Enucleation remains the standard therapy for large, choroidal melanomas and melanomas that cause severe glaucoma or invade the optic nerve. Standard treatment options:Tumor growth pattern is a factor in the therapeutic decision. If there is a diffuse melanoma or if there is extraocular extension, enucleation should be considered, but radiation therapy can be employed for less extensive disease. Medium-sized choroidal melanomasPlaque radiation therapy.[1,2,3,4]External-beam, charged-particle radiation therapy: This approach is offered at specialized referral centers. It requires careful patient cooperation, with voluntary fixation of gaze.[5,6,7]Local eye-wall resection.[8,9]Combined therapy, with ablative laser coagulation or transpupillary thermotherapy to supplement plaque treatment.[10,11]Enucleation. This approach is

  2. Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Small Choroidal Melanoma

    A wide range of 5-year mortality rates have been reported among patients treated for small choroidal melanomas, with an average rate of about 16%.[1,2] Several studies indicate that the two most important clinical factors predictive of mortality are larger tumor size (at the time of treatment) and documentation of tumor growth.[3]The management of small choroidal melanomas is controversial. The likelihood of progression from the time of diagnosis to growth warranting treatment has not been well characterized. Many ophthalmologists advocate initial observation. This initial management strategy is justified on several grounds, including the difficulty in establishing a correct diagnosis, the lack of any documented efficacy for globe-conserving treatments, and concerns for severe treatment-related morbidity. Others have advocated earlier therapeutic intervention.[4,5,6]Standard treatment options:Observation: This strategy is important for patients with an uncertain diagnosis or in

  3. Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma

    Recurrent intraocular melanoma is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The melanoma may come back in the eye or in other parts of the body.

  4. Skin Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (05 / 31 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Changes were made to this summary to match those made to the health professional version.

  5. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stages of Melanoma

    After melanoma has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the skin or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out whether cancer has spread within the skin or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. Talk with your doctor about what the stage of your cancer is. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient's health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.Lymph node mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy: Procedures in which a radioactive substance and/or blue dye is injected near the tumor. The substance or dye flows through lymph ducts to the

  6. Melanoma, Malignant

    Malignant Melanoma is a common skin cancer that arises from the melanin cells within the upper layer of the skin (epidermis) or from similar cells that may be found in moles (nevi). This type of skin cancer may send down roots into deeper layers of the skin. Some of these microscopic roots may spread (metastasize) causing new tumor growths in vital organs of the body.. ...

  7. Skin Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Interventions With Inadequate Evidence as to Whether They Reduce Risk of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Sunscreen Use and Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation AvoidanceBenefitsThe evidence that interventions designed to reduce exposure to UV radiation by the use of sunscreen, protective clothing, or limitation of sun exposure time decrease the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer is inadequate. A randomized study suggested a possible reduction in incidence of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), but study design and analysis problems complicate interpretation of the results.[1,2]Magnitude of Benefit: Not applicable (N/A) (inadequate evidence).Study Design: One randomized controlled trial (RCT) with tumor incidence as the outcome and one RCT with actinic keratosis as the outcome for SCC; cohort studies for basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Other study designs give inconsistent results.Internal Validity: Poor.Consistency: Poor.External Validity: Poor.HarmsThe harms of sunscreen use are poorly quantified but are likely to be small, including allergic reactions to skin creams and lower production of vitamin D

  8. Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer and actinic keratosis. Different types of treatment are available for patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer and actinic keratosis. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.Five types of standard treatment are used:Surgery One or more of the following surgical procedures may be used to treat nonmelanoma skin cancer or actinic keratosis:Mohs micrographic surgery: The tumor is cut from the skin in thin layers.

  9. Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult PrimaryTreatment of untreated metastatic squamous neck cancer with occult primary may include the following:Radiation therapy.Surgery.Radiation therapy followed by surgery.A clinical trial of chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy.A clinical trial of chemotherapy given at the same time as hyperfractionated radiation therapy.Clinical trials of new treatments.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with untreated metastatic squamous neck cancer with occult primary. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug.

  10. Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062750-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Skin Cancer Screening

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