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Skin Cancer

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Skin Cancer Outlook

Although the number of skin cancers in the U.S. continues to rise, more skin cancers are being caught earlier, when they are easier to treat. Thus, illness and death rates have decreased.

When treated properly, the cure rate for both basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) approaches 95%. The remaining cancers recur at some point after treatment.

  • Recurrences of these cancers are almost always local (not spread elsewhere in the body), but they often cause significant tissue destruction.
  • 2% of squamous cell carcinomas will eventually spread elsewhere in the body and turn into dangerous cancer. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is usually seen in people with compromised immune systems.

In most cases, the outcome of malignant melanoma depends on the thickness of the tumor at the time of treatment.

  • Thin lesions are almost always cured by simple surgery alone.
  • Thicker tumors, which usually have been present for some time but have gone undetected, may spread to other organs. Surgery removes the tumor and any local spread, but it cannot remove distant metastasis. Other therapies, such as radiation therapy, immunotherapy or chemotherapy, are used to treat the metastatic tumors.
  • Malignant melanoma causes more than 75% of deaths from skin cancer.
  • Almost 76,100 people are expected to be diagnosed with melanoma in the U.S. in 2014, and an estimated 12,000 people will die from some form of skin cancer the same year.

 

Skin Cancer Support Groups and Counseling

Living with skin cancer presents many new challenges for you and for your family and friends. You will probably have many worries about how the cancer will affect you and your ability to "live a normal life," that is, to care for your family and home, to hold your job, and to continue the friendships and activities you enjoy.

Many people with a skin cancer diagnosis feel anxious and depressed. Some people feel angry and resentful; others feel helpless and defeated. For most people with skin cancer, talking about their feelings and concerns helps. Your friends and family members can be very supportive. They may be hesitant to offer support until they see how you are coping. Don't wait for them to bring it up. If you want to talk about your concerns, let them know.

Some people don't want to "burden" their loved ones, or prefer talking about their concerns with a more neutral professional. A social worker, counselor, or member of the clergy can be helpful. Your dermatologist or oncologist should be able to recommend someone.

Many people with cancer are profoundly helped by talking to other people who have cancer. Sharing your concerns with others who have been through the same thing can be remarkably reassuring. Support groups for people with cancer may be available through the medical center where you are receiving your treatment. The American Cancer Society also has information about support groups throughout the U.S. 

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