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Cellular Classification of Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma

    Primary intraocular melanomas originate from melanocytes in the uveal tract.[1] Four distinct cellular types are recognized in intraocular melanoma (revised Callender classification):[2]

    1. Spindle-A cells (spindle-shaped cells with slender nuclei and lacking visible nucleoli).
    2. Spindle-B cells (spindle-shaped cells with larger nuclei and distinct nucleoli).
    3. Epithelioid cells (larger polygonal cells with one or more prominent nucleoli).
    4. Intermediate cells (similar to but smaller than epithelioid cells).

    Most primary intraocular melanomas contain variable proportions of epithelioid, spindle-A, and spindle-B cells (mixed-cell melanomas). Pure epithelioid-cell primary melanomas are infrequent (approximately 3% of cases).[1] In the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, mixed-cell type melanomas predominated (86% of cases).[3]

    Recommended Related to Melanoma/Skin Cancer

    Description of the Evidence

    Background Incidence and mortality There are three main types of skin cancer: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (together with BCC referred to as nonmelanoma skincancer [NMSC]). Melanoma. BCC and SCC are the most common forms of skin cancer but have substantially better prognoses than the less common, generally more aggressive, melanoma. NMSC is the most commonly occurring cancer in the United States. Its incidence appears to...

    Read the Description of the Evidence article > >

    References:

    1. Klintworth GK, Scroggs MW: The eye and ocular adnexa. In: Sternberg SS, ed.: Diagnostic Surgical Pathology. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1999, pp 994-6.
    2. Grossniklaus HE, Green WR: Uveal tumors. In: Garner A, Klintworth GK, eds.: Pathobiology of Occular Disease: A Dynamic Approach. 2nd ed. New York, NY: M. Dekker, 1994, pp 1423-77.
    3. Histopathologic characteristics of uveal melanomas in eyes enucleated from the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study. COMS report no. 6. Am J Ophthalmol 125 (6): 745-66, 1998.

      WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

      Last Updated: February 25, 2014
      This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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