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7 Ways to Help Prevent Heart Disease

Lots of things affect whether you get heart disease, and you control many of them. Little things you do every day can make a difference.

1. Unwind and connect. Cut out as much stress as possible. Find ways to ease the stress you can't avoid. Exercise, meditation, and talking to people you trust are three ideas to start with.Work on your weight. Most Americans are overweight. Bringing your weight to a healthy level is a plus for your heart.

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2. Upgrade your next meal. Favor fruits, vegetables, lean protein, and whole grains. Pass on foods that are salty, high in fat, or fried. Repeat for the meal after that, and so on, until it's routine.

3. Make an exercise menu. For your heart's sake, you should make it a habit to be active, so pick a couple of activities that sound like fun. That way, you always have some choices about what to do when you exercise at least three to four times a week for 30 minutes at a time. It burns calories and helps keep extra pounds off.

4. Rethink your drink. Limit alcohol. Moderate drinking may be OK, but more than that is bad for you. What's moderate drinking? Up to 1 glass a day for women, and up to 2 glasses a day for men.

5. Check your numbers. Many people have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or blood sugar levels that are too high, and they don't know it. Your doctor can check all of these things and, if any of your numbers are too high, recommend a plan of action.

6. Don't smoke. Smoking is not just bad for your lungs. It also makes heart disease more likely.

7. Consult your doctor. Your doctor can help you figure out if your family's medical history puts you at risk, and if there's anything else you should be doing.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by James Beckerman, MD, FACC on August 24, 2012
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