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Some Infertile Men Show Higher Cancer Risk: Study

Factors that contribute to lack of sperm may also raise odds for tumors, researchers say
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WebMD News from HealthDay

By Amy Norton

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Men who are infertile because they produce no sperm may have a higher-than-average risk of developing cancer, a new study finds.

Researchers found that of more than 2,000 men with fertility problems, those with no sperm production had an increased risk of developing cancer over the next six years.

The men were young going into the study (about age 36, on average), so few did develop cancer. Among men with no sperm -- what doctors call azoospermia -- just over 2 percent were diagnosed with cancer.

Still, their risk was three times higher than that of the average man their age.

"They have the cancer risk of a man about 10 years older," said lead researcher Dr. Michael Eisenberg, an assistant professor of urology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

About 15 percent of infertile men are azoospermic, according to the study, which was published June 20 in the journal Fertility and Sterility.

This isn't the first work to connect male infertility to cancer risk, but it suggests the link may be concentrated among men with the most severe type of infertility.

"This suggests that it's not male infertility in general, but azoospermia in particular," Eisenberg said.

That's an important piece of information, said a male-infertility expert not involved in the study. If the link between male infertility and cancer is real, you would expect that more severe infertility would be tied to a greater cancer risk, said Dr. Thomas Walsh, of the University of Washington in Seattle.

"This reinforces the idea that this is a real relationship," Walsh said.

He said he doubts anyone would say that infertility is causing cancer. But he and Eisenberg said it's possible that some common genetic factors contribute to both azoospermia and a greater vulnerability to cancer.

"When we see a man with azoospermia, we usually assume there's a genetic cause," Eisenberg said. There are certain gene mutations already tied to the condition, but a minority of azoospermic men turn out to have one of them when they are tested. That means there are likely other, as yet unknown, gene defects involved in azoospermia, Eisenberg said.

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