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    Treatment of Menopause Symptoms

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    Are There Any Treatments for Symptoms of Menopause?

    There are a number of different treatment options to consider if you're suffering from symptoms of menopause.

    Lifestyle changes. A healthy diet and regular exercise program will go a long way towards minimizing the symptoms of menopause and helping to maintain overall good health. It is also a good idea to finally kick any old, unhealthy habits, such as smoking or drinking too much alcohol. Other interventions that may be helpful are to dress lightly and in layers and avoid potential triggers like caffeine and spicy foods.

    Recommended Related to Menopause

    Guys' Guide to Menopause

    Menopause isn't just a rough time for women -- it's also hard for the men who love them. If your spouse or partner is in the throes of "the change," unpleasant symptoms like hot flashes and mood swings will probably affect you and your relationship. In a recent survey, 38% of men said their wife's night sweats and insomnia related to menopause affected intimacy, and they cited their partner's lack of sleep or poor sleep as the main reason. You may not be able to prevent hot flashes, but you can...

    Read the Guys' Guide to Menopause article > >

    For vaginal dryness, moisturizers and nonestrogen lubricants such as KY Jelly, Replens, and Astroglide are available.

    Click here for more about maintaining a healthy lifestyle after menopause.

    Prescription medication. Treatment with estrogen and progesterone, called combination hormone replacement therapy (HRT), can be prescribed for women who still have their uterus, if they have moderate to severe symptoms of menopause. Estrogen alone is the prescribed regimen for women who have had a hysterectomy (no longer have their uterus).

    In the past, HRT was widely recommended for the treatment of menopausal symptoms as well the prevention of osteoporosis and heart disease. A large study known as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) shed new light on how HRT is viewed.

    According to the WHI study results, combination HRT increases the risk of heart disease, breast cancer, blood clots, and stroke. Estrogen-only HRT was found to increase the risk of blood clots and stroke but did not increase a woman's chance of getting breast cancer or heart disease. Although the WHI study found an increase in the risk of heart disease in women taking combination HRT, a more recent study suggests this finding may not be relevant to all postmenopausal women.

    A study published in the March 5, 2008, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association reported on WHI participants three years after they stopped combination HRT therapy. The researchers found that "many of the health effects of hormones such as increased risk of heart disease are diminished, but overall risks, including risks of stroke, blood clots, and cancer, remain high." The study also concluded that the increased risk of breast cancer appears to linger and "other effects of combination hormones, such as decreased risk of colorectal cancer and hip fractures, also stopped when therapy ended."

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