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Menopause Health Center

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Talking to Your Doctor About Menopause

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Get a Second Opinion

Because we're always learning more about menopause treatment options and hormone therapy, it can be confusing to figure out how to treat or manage menopausal symptoms. It is important for you to trust your doctor so that you can openly discuss your concerns and treatment options. Then you can make informed decisions about your health that you feel good about. If you feel that you have talked openly with your doctor and still don't feel satisfied, think about getting a second opinion.

Getting a second opinion from a different doctor might give you a fresh perspective and more information on treatments. Here are some tips for how to get a second opinion:

  • Ask your doctor to recommend another doctor or specialist for another opinion. Don't worry about hurting your doctor's feelings.
  • If you don't feel comfortable asking your doctor for recommendations, contact another doctor you trust. You can also call university teaching hospitals and medical societies in your area for names of doctors. Some of this information is available on the Internet.
  • Always check with your health insurance provider first to make sure the cost of a second opinion is covered. Many health insurance providers do. Ask if there are any special procedures you or your primary care doctor need to follow for referrals.
  • Arrange to have your medical records sent to the second opinion doctor before your visit. This gives the new doctor time to look at your records and can help you to avoid repeating medical tests.
  • Learn as much as you can. Ask your doctor for information you can read, go to a local library, or do a search on the Internet. Some teaching hospitals and universities have medical libraries that are open to the public. But sorting through information that is complicated and sometimes contradictory can be a daunting task. List your questions and concerns and bring the list to discuss with the doctor.
  • Never rely solely on the telephone or Internet for a second opinion. When you get a second opinion, you need to be seen in person by a doctor. A sound second opinion includes a physical exam and a thorough review of your medical records. Don't forget to ask the doctor to send a written report to your primary care doctor and get a copy for your records.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Nivin Todd, MD on December 09, 2013
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