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Sex and Menopause

How Does Menopause Affect Sex Drive?

The loss of estrogen and testosterone following menopause can lead to changes in a woman's body and sexual drive. Menopausal and postmenopausal women may notice that they're not as easily aroused, and they may be less sensitive to touching and stroking. That can lead to less interest in sex.

Also, lower levels of estrogen can cause a drop in blood supply to the vagina. That can affect vaginal lubrication, causing the vagina to be too dry for comfortable sex -- but there's help for that.

Recommended Related to Menopause

Postmenopausal Bleeding

If you've completed menopause -- meaning you've gone without a period for more than 1 year -- you shouldn't have any menstrual bleeding. Even a little spotting is not normal after menopause. If you have postmenopausal bleeding, make an appointment to see your doctor as soon as possible. It could be caused by a number of health problems, some of which are serious. Here are the most common causes of postmenopausal bleeding.

Read the Postmenopausal Bleeding article > >

Other factors may influence a woman's level of interest in sex during menopause and after. These include:

Does Menopause Lower Sex Drive in all Women?

No. Some postmenopausal women say they've got an improved sex drive. That may be due to less anxiety linked to a fear of pregnancy. Also, many postmenopausal women often have fewer child-rearing responsibilities, allowing them to relax and enjoy intimacy with their partners.

What Can I Do to Treat Vaginal Dryness During Menopause?

During and after menopause, vaginal dryness can be treated with water-soluble lubricants such as Astroglide or K-Y Jelly. 

Do not use non-water-soluble lubricants such as Vaseline, because they can weaken latex, the material used to make condoms. You or your partner should keep using condoms until your doctor confirms you're no longer ovulating -- and to prevent getting an STD. Non-water-soluble lubricants can also provide a medium for bacterial growth, particularly in a person whose immune system has been weakened by chemotherapy

Vaginal moisturizers like Replens and Luvena can also be used on a more regular basis to maintain moisture in the vagina. You can also talk to your doctor about vaginal estrogen therapy. 

An oral drug taken once a day, Osphena, makes vaginal tissue thicker and less fragile, resulting in less pain for women during sex. The FDA warns that Osphena can thicken the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) and raise the risk of stroke and blood clots.   

How Can I Improve My Sex Drive During and After Menopause?

Estrogen replacement may work, but more research is needed. Estrogen can make sex less painful by treating vaginal dryness, though.

Next Article:

What do you use to boost sex in menopause?