Skip to content

Substance Abuse and Addiction Health Center

Meth 101

Methamphetamine use has taken off in the U.S., but what makes it such a hot commodity?
Font Size
A
A
A
By
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Use of methamphetamine, a powerful and addictive stimulant, is rampant and spreading across the United States, reaching levels that have been called "epidemic."

In places where it hasn't been a problem in the past, it may seem to have come out of nowhere, but methamphetamine has been a fixture of the American drug scene for a long time.

A lot of recent news coverage has focused on the impact of methamphetamine among gay men, who are taking it, having risky sex, and possibly fanning the flames of HIV/AIDS. Michael Siever, PhD, director of the Stonewall Project, a San Francisco outreach program for gay men, says the drug is nothing new in his neighborhood.

"I've been doing work on methamphetamine in the gay community for about 15 years now," he tells WebMD.

From War to Prison

Like several other drugs that are now illegal, methamphetamine got off to a legitimate start. During World War II, soldiers on all sides were given the drug to help keep them in fighting form. Throughout the 1950s, doctors commonly prescribed methamphetamine as a diet pill and antidepressant, known by the brand name Methedrine.

Today, there are many slang names for it, including "ice," "crystal," "glass," "Tina," "crank," and just "meth." Though it's sometimes sold in pill form, meth mainly comes in the form of a white powder or crystals. It can be swallowed, snorted, injected, or as is becoming more common, smoked.

When it's smoked or injected, it brings on an immediate and intense euphoric rush that lasts several minutes. Taken other ways, the high comes on more gradually, producing an elevated sense of well-being, increased alertness and activity, and decreased appetite, which lasts up to 12 hours. The effects of meth are often compared to those of cocaine.

Meth works by flooding the brain with massive amounts of dopamine, a neurochemical normally released in small amounts in response to something pleasurable. It also raises blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, and body temperature.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Today on WebMD

pills pouring from prescription bottle
Video
Hangover Myths Slideshow
Slideshow
 
Woman experiencing withdrawal symptoms
Article
prescription medication
Article
 
Hands reaching for medicine
Article
overturned shot glass
Article
 
assortment of medication
Article
How to Avoid Social Drinking
Article