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Worried About Addiction? - Topic Overview

If you follow your doctor's directions about taking narcotic medicines—and you don't have a history of substance abuse—your risk of getting addicted is small. In the past, narcotics were used only for short periods for short-term pain or for cancer pain. Many experts now also use them for longer periods to treat chronic pain. You can take these drugs, which are sometimes called opioids, to reduce pain and increase your functioning without becoming addicted.

If you stop taking narcotics suddenly, you may get nausea, sweating, chills, diarrhea, and shaking. The symptoms aren't life-threatening.

You can avoid withdrawal symptoms if you gradually stop taking the medicines over a set period of time. Work with your doctor to see how to gradually stop taking the medicine you are on.

What should you do if you think you may be addicted?

If you think you may be addicted, talk to your doctor. Signs of addiction include the following:

  • Your drug use is having a bad effect on your family life, your job, or other activities.
  • You keep using the drug even though it is actually harming your body or your behavior.
  • You're taking larger amounts of the drug than was intended. Or you're taking it longer than was intended.

When you are addicted to painkillers for a long time, withdrawal can be very difficult. But treatment is available to help you through that process.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: March 12, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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