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Meditation May Reduce Mild Depression, Anxiety

But effect appears small to moderate, researchers add

continued...

Another expert agreed.

"It appears that for all forms of meditation, more time spent meditating will yield larger effects," said Simon Rego, director of psychology training at Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City.

"In other words, meditation is a skill that requires instruction from an expert followed by regular practice in daily life, so it's possible that in many of the trials reviewed the amount of training or the dose afforded in the trials was too small, and with more time, better results would have been found," Rego explained. "Hopefully, future research will examine this hypothesis."

Over the past three decades, interest in meditation has grown tremendously in Western culture, including the health care system, Rego pointed out.

"Many mental health professionals touting the health benefits of meditation either include meditative techniques as part of their treatment packages or focus solely on teaching these techniques as a primary aim for improving mental health," he said.

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