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Paranoid Personality Disorder

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How Is Paranoid Personality Disorder Treated?

People with PPD often do not seek treatment on their own because they do not see themselves as having a problem. When treatment is sought, psychotherapy (a form of counseling) is the treatment of choice for PPD. Treatment likely will focus on increasing general coping skills, as well as on improving social interaction, communication, and self-esteem.

Because trust is an important factor of psychotherapy, treatment is challenging since people with PPD have such distrust of others. As a result, many people with PPD do not follow their treatment plan.

Medication generally is not a major focus of treatment for PPD. However, medications, such as anti-anxiety, antidepressant or anti-psychotic drugs, might be prescribed if the person's symptoms are extreme, or if he or she also suffers from an associated psychological problem, such as anxiety or depression.

What Complications Are Associated With Paranoid Personality Disorder?

The thinking and behaviors associated with PPD can interfere with a person's ability to maintain relationships, as well as their ability to function socially and in work situations. In many cases, people with PPD become involved in legal battles, suing people or companies they believe are "out to get them."

What Is the Outlook for People With Paranoid Personality Disorder?

The outlook for people with PPD varies. It is a chronic disorder, which means it tends to last throughout a person's life. Although some people can function fairly well with PPD and are able to marry and hold jobs, others are complete disabled by the disorder. Because people with PPD tend to resist treatment, the outcome often is poor.

Can Paranoid Personality Disorder Be Prevented?

Although prevention of PDD might not be possible, treatment can sometimes allow a person who is prone to this condition to learn more productive ways of dealing with situations.

 

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg, MD on May 23, 2014
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