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Medication Headaches

Many drugs can induce acute headache, including nitroglycerin, antihypertensive agents (beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors, and methyldopa), dipyridamole, hydralazine, sildenafil, histamine receptor antagonists (e.g., cimetidine and ranitidine), NSAIDs (especially indomethacin), cyclosporine, and antibiotics (especially amphotericin, griseofulvin, tetracycline, and sulfonamides).

Drug-induced aseptic meningitis, a rare occurrence, has numerous possible causes, including NSAIDs, antibiotics (e.g., trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, sulfasalazine, cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin, isoniazid, and penicillin), intrathecal drugs and diagnostics (e.g., antineoplastic agents such as methotrexate and cytarabine; gentamicin; corticosteroids; spinal anesthesia; baclofen; repeated iophendylate for myelography; and radiolabeled albumin); intraventricular chemotherapy; intravenous immunoglobulin; vaccines (polio; measles, mumps, and rubella; and hepatitis B); and some other drugs, such as carbamazepine, muromonab-CD3, and ranitidine.43

Recommended Related to Migraines/Headaches

Ocular Migraine Treatment

Since it is brief, the vision loss of ocular migraines is not usually treated. But you may need relief for the headache that accompanies or follows it. The primary treatment for ocular migraines is to reduce exposure to triggers. Calcium-channel blockers are the main drug treatment for ocular migraines. They work by relaxing the blood vessels. One example is Cardene, which can be given as a pill or as a tab you put under the tongue.     

Read the Ocular Migraine Treatment article > >

The clinical presentation of drug-induced aseptic meningitis is the same as that of viral meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid findings are the same as those in viral meningitis, except for a neutrophil predominance; however, in cases induced by intravenous immunoglobulin, eosinophils are present.

WebMD Medical Reference from WebMD Scientific American Medicine

Reviewed by Lily Jung, MD on December 01, 2006
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