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Migraines & Headaches Health Center

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Medication Headaches

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Many drugs can induce acute headache, including nitroglycerin, antihypertensive agents (beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors, and methyldopa), dipyridamole, hydralazine, sildenafil, histamine receptor antagonists (e.g., cimetidine and ranitidine), NSAIDs (especially indomethacin), cyclosporine, and antibiotics (especially amphotericin, griseofulvin, tetracycline, and sulfonamides).

Drug-induced aseptic meningitis, a rare occurrence, has numerous possible causes, including NSAIDs, antibiotics (e.g., trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, sulfasalazine, cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin, isoniazid, and penicillin), intrathecal drugs and diagnostics (e.g., antineoplastic agents such as methotrexate and cytarabine; gentamicin; corticosteroids; spinal anesthesia; baclofen; repeated iophendylate for myelography; and radiolabeled albumin); intraventricular chemotherapy; intravenous immunoglobulin; vaccines (polio; measles, mumps, and rubella; and hepatitis B); and some other drugs, such as carbamazepine, muromonab-CD3, and ranitidine.43

Recommended Related to Migraines/Headaches

Cluster Headache

Important It is possible that the main title of the report Cluster Headache is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

Read the Cluster Headache article > >

The clinical presentation of drug-induced aseptic meningitis is the same as that of viral meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid findings are the same as those in viral meningitis, except for a neutrophil predominance; however, in cases induced by intravenous immunoglobulin, eosinophils are present.

WebMD Medical Reference from WebMD Scientific American Medicine

Reviewed by Lily Jung, MD on December 01, 2006
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