Nausea Drugs for Migraines and Headaches

Many people who have migraines often have nausea and vomiting along with their head pain. Those symptoms usually get better when you treat the migraine. But sometimes the nausea and vomiting are bad enough to keep a person from taking their migraine medications. In these cases, a nausea drug can relieve your symptoms and help you get the treatment you need.

Most nausea medicines come in pill form, but if the problem is severe, you can take them as a rectal suppository.

Learn more about some specific nausea medications:

 

Generic Name Brand Name Possible Side Effects
promethazine hydrochloride (available in tablet, syrup, injection, or suppository form) Phenergan Confusion, drowsiness, dizziness, upset stomach, excitability, nightmares, uncontrollable muscle movements, and lip smacking or chewing movements
chlorpromazine (available in suppository form) Thorazine Confusion, drowsiness, dizziness, upset stomach, excitability, nightmares, uncontrollable muscle movements, and lip smacking or chewing movements
prochlorperazine (available in tablet and suppository form) Compazine Confusion, drowsiness, dizziness, upset stomach, excitability, nightmares, uncontrollable muscle movements, and lip smacking or chewing movements
Trimetho-benzamide hydrochloride (available in capsule, injection, syrup, or suppository form) Tigan Low blood pressure, blurred vision, drowsiness, dizziness, feeling disoriented, uncontrollable muscle movements, and lip smacking or chewing movements
metoclopramide hydrochloride (available in syrup, tablet, or injection form) Reglan Uncontrollable muscle movements, lip smacking or chewing movements, sensitivity to sunlight, aching in the lower legs, diarrhea

 

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Richard Senelick, MD on January 13, 2017
© 2017 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.