Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Migraines & Headaches Health Center

Font Size

Migraines and Menopause

Female hormones and migraine headaches are linked. That's one of the reasons why women are three times more likely to get migraines than men.

For many women, menopause brings a welcome end to these headaches. But the hormonal changes leading up to menopause can sometimes make things worse before they get better.

Recommended Related to Migraines/Headaches

What Is a Migraine Without Aura?

A migraine without aura is more than just a headache. The pain alone is enough to stop you from carrying on your daily activities. And then there's the nausea, maybe vomiting, and more. What makes this headache a migraine? What does it mean to have a migraine without aura? How is this different from other headaches or other migraines? Most important, what can you do to make the migraine go away? Here is information you can use to manage migraines without auras. Find out about their symptoms, causes,...

Read the What Is a Migraine Without Aura? article > >

Still, no matter when in life you have migraines, the right treatment can help prevent the headaches or make the pain go away.

What Makes Migraines Different?

People who get migraines describe them as an intense pulsing or throbbing type of pain, often on one side of the head. Along with the pain they can also have symptoms like:

  • Flashing lights or "aura"
  • Nausea
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Vomiting

When you have one, you may be unable to do your normal activities.

Many people get migraines from time to time. But some, usually women, have them as often as 15 or more days each month.

These headaches are triggered by things like:

  • Bright lights
  • Foods or drinks
  • Hunger
  • Lack of sleep
  • Stress
  • Strong scents

The Migraine-Hormone Link

A drop in the female hormone, estrogen, can also set off migraines. That's why women who get migraines often have headaches right before their period, when estrogen levels are low. During pregnancy, estrogen levels rise, bringing many women a break from these headaches. But they often start up again after the baby is born.

As you get closer to menopause, your hormone levels can swing up and down, and your periods may get more irregular. If your migraines are tied to your menstrual cycle, they may become as unpredictable as your periods.

Some women get migraines for the first time, or their headaches get more intense, in the years just before menopause. Others find that their migraines become less frequent and less intense. 

Women who had their uterus and ovaries removed with surgery often have more of a problem with migraines than those who go into menopause naturally.

Treating Menopause Migraines

You have many options for relieving migraines.

Sometimes a few simple lifestyle changes can help:

  • Keep a diary of what you eat, and try to avoid foods that trigger your migraines. Some of these may include: aged cheese, chocolate, or artificial sweeteners.
  • Eat meals at regular times.
  • Go to sleep and wake up at the same time each day.
  • Cut stress using relaxation methods such as deep breathing, exercise, or massage.

You can also try medicines to relieve your headaches. Migraine drugs fall into two categories.

Medicines that help prevent migraines from starting:

Medicines that relieve a migraine once it has already started:

WebMD Medical Reference

Today on WebMD

woman receiving acupuncture
14 alternative methods for migraine relief.
woman with migraine
Get the truth about migraines.
 
headache in the bedroom
Keep headaches from ruining your sex life.
desert heat
12 surprising headache triggers.
 
woman with migraine
Quiz
drinking coffee
Article
 
Migraines Headaches Basics
Article
acupuncture needles in woman's back
Slideshow
 
young woman with migraine
Articles
spraying perfume
Article
 
man with a headache
Article
headache in the bedroom
Article
 

Special Sections