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Migraines & Headaches Health Center

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Some Kinds of Red Wine May Not Trigger Migraines

Researchers Say More Tannins May Mean More Headache Pain
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

June 20, 2012 -- Many migraine sufferers find that the pleasure of a having a glass of red wine is soon followed by the pain of a headache. Now a small new study suggests that when it comes to migraines, some types of red wine may be more likely to trigger a headache than others.

"My suggestion is the more tannins the wine has, [the] more migraine attacks it triggers," says researcher Abouch V. Krymchantowski, MD, PhD, of the Rio Headache Center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in an email to WebMD.

Tannins are flavonoids in red wine that give it a drying, sometimes puckering quality. The more tannins a wine has, the more it will dry out your mouth after you sip it.

No one is quite sure why red wine may trigger headaches, but some studies have shown that tannins may boost production of the brain chemical serotonin. Changes in serotonin levels may trigger migraines in susceptible individuals.

Krymchantowski asked 40 patients at his headache clinic to try an experiment. The patients had said their migraines were triggered by drinking red wine.

He gave them half-bottles of four different kinds of wine: a malbec, a tannat, a cabernet sauvignon, and a merlot. All the wines were from South America. The malbec and the tannat were high in tannins, while the carbernet and the merlot had lower tannin levels. He asked people to wait at least four days after drinking one of the half-bottles before they tried another.

Thirty-three patients completed the study. Nearly 90% had at least one migraine attack within 12 hours of drinking one of the half-bottles of red wine. About half of the people in the study had at least two migraine attacks after drinking the various reds. About a third of patients got a migraine after every half-bottle. Four people didn't get a migraine after drinking any of the wines.

Among the 18 patients who had at least two migraine attacks after drinking the red wines, Krymchantowski says the wines with the highest tannin content, the tannat and the malbec, were the most likely to have been the apparent triggers of those attacks.

The study was presented at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Headache Society in Los Angeles.

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