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Multiple Sclerosis Health Center

Q and A With Avril Lavigne

The singer-songwriter talks about her music, her healthy habits, and her efforts to help those with multiple sclerosis.
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By Kim Caviness
WebMD Magazine - Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Avril Lavigne burst onto the music scene when she was just 17. Raised in the small town of Napanee, Ontario, her debut album Let Go, released in 2002, went platinum four times. Its most popular song, "Complicated," became a number-one single worldwide, as have four other singles released since then. Her fourth and most recent album, Goodbye Lullaby, released in March 2011, scored chart success in the United States and abroad. In addition to her highly successful career in singing and songwriting, Lavigne, 27, has acted in films and created lines of both clothing and perfume. WebMD the Magazine recently asked the young star about her work to help people with multiple sclerosis, how she stays in shape on the road, and just what inspires her to write a song.

March is Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month, and your Avril Lavigne Foundation has partnered with the Race to Erase MS, the annual fundraising gala hosted by the Nancy Davis Foundation for Multiple Sclerosis. What are you doing this month to help make a difference for those who have this chronic autoimmune condition that affects the central nervous system?

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Helping to raise awareness about MS and continuing the conversation to educate people about this disease is what is most important.

What inspired you to get involved? Do you have a personal connection?

Meeting Nancy Davis and hearing her story is what got me involved. I was so moved by her determination after she was diagnosed with MS in 1993 to help find a cure for this disease that I really wanted to get on board and help out any way I could.

What do you want people to know about MS?

MS is a disease that affects the whole family, not just a person. It affects twice as many women as men and there is no cure. Also, it is not contagious! MS is a random disease, but there is some research that shows there is a higher risk in some families. 

You've been touring and working hard to support your latest album Goodbye Lullaby. How do you stay in shape when you're on the road?

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